recidivism

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re·cid·i·vism

 (rĭ-sĭd′ə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The repeating of or returning to criminal behavior by the same offender or type of offender.

[From recidivist, one who recidivates, from French récidiviste, from récidiver, to relapse, from Medieval Latin recidīvāre, from Latin recidīvus, falling back, from recidere, to fall back : re-, re- + cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

re·cid′i·vist n.
re·cid′i·vis′tic, re·cid′i·vous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recidivism

(rɪˈsɪdɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Law) habitual relapse into crime
[C19: from Latin recidīvus falling back, from re- + cadere to fall]
reˈcidivist n, adj
reˌcidiˈvistic, reˈcidivous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•cid•i•vism

(rɪˈsɪd əˌvɪz əm)

n.
repeated or habitual relapse, as into crime.
[1885–90; < Latin recidīv(us) relapsing (recid(ere) to fall back)]
re•cid′i•vist, n., adj.
re•cid`i•vis′tic, re•cid′i•vous, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

recidivism

a repeated relapsing into criminal or delinquent behavior. — recidivist, n. — recidivistic, recidivous, adj.
See also: Crime
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recidivism - habitual relapse into crime
lapsing, relapse, relapsing, backsliding, reverting, lapse, reversion - a failure to maintain a higher state
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recidivism

noun
A slipping from a higher or better condition to a lower or poorer one:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

recidivism

[rɪˈsɪdɪvɪzəm] Nreincidencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recidivism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recidivism

[rɪˈsɪdɪˌvɪzm] nrecidività
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity
n. recidiva, reincidencia, tendencia a recaer en una condición, enfermedad o síntoma previo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
He said this included tackling the illegal immigrant issue, reducing the recidivism rate, guarding the country's land and maritime borders and reformation of security laws.
The executive order specifically calls for the task force to look at how to reduce Oklahoma's incarceration rate, reduce the recidivism rate, and enhance and establish diversion programs.
And that has cut the recidivism rate, for those 7,500, in half - from 20 to under 10 percent.&nbsp; And I just think that makes sense for us to do to help them out," during the prison reform&nbsp;meeting with the president in January.&nbsp;
Thus far, the nation's collective recidivism rate, as measured by BJS, has shown no signs of dropping.
Although a recidivism rate north of 50 percent may seem high, it is also worth considering the fiscal implications of a drop from 77 percent to, say, 68 percent.
In fact, by working with locals in the Safer Peterborough Partnership, One Service reduced the recidivism rate of these short-sentence offenders by 9 percent more than a national control group.
Over the decade of the study, the average recidivism rate in the country--the rate at which formerly incarcerated people are convicted of new crimes that send them back to prison--rose by 2.6 percent.
Overall it's down on 2008 which recorded a 51% recidivism rate. The following year the reoffending rate among men was 48.2%, compared with 41.2% for women.
In Connecticut, for example, those released in 2007 showed a recidivism rate of 43.9 percent, but for those released in 2010, the rate fell to 40 percent -- an 8.9 percent reduction.
Recent research on prison education programs presents discouraging statistics on the current recidivism rate or the rate of the habitual relapse into crime.
Connecticut has reduced its recidivism rate from 47 percent in 2007 to 41 percent in 2013, according to The CT Mirror.
Goodwill's transitional employment program has a recidivism rate of less than 10 percent, which is much better than the state's average recidivism rate of 44 percent.