recidivist

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re·cid·i·vism

 (rĭ-sĭd′ə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The repeating of or returning to criminal behavior by the same offender or type of offender.

[From recidivist, one who recidivates, from French récidiviste, from récidiver, to relapse, from Medieval Latin recidīvāre, from Latin recidīvus, falling back, from recidere, to fall back : re-, re- + cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

re·cid′i·vist n.
re·cid′i·vis′tic, re·cid′i·vous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recidivist

A person who has committed crimes in the past and shows a tendency to relapse into crime at a later date.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recidivist - someone who is repeatedly arrested for criminal behavior (especially for the same criminal behavior)
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
2.recidivist - someone who lapses into previous undesirable patterns of behaviorrecidivist - someone who lapses into previous undesirable patterns of behavior
offender, wrongdoer - a person who transgresses moral or civil law
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
recidivista

recidivist

[rɪˈsɪdɪvɪst] Nreincidente mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recidivist

nRückfällige(r) mf
adjrückfällig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recidivist

[rɪˈsɪdɪvɪst] nrecidivo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The combination of presumptive guidelines and mandatory sentencing laws represent the dominant approach to sentencing reform in the United States since the 1970s.(34) Both are extremely severe on recidivists.
("See, son, that illiterate prisoner sure is gettin' what he deserves, havin' to learn to read and all" probably isn't what chain gang proponents have in mind.) Of course, we wouldn't be able to have second and third chances at humiliating these recidivists because educated prisoners might actually become contributing citizens rather than repeat performers.
A 1979 study of 258 adult recidivists revealed that 78 percent of the inmates showed truancy as the first entry on their arrest records.
In 1995, the IRS decided to send recidivists fewer notices than other nonfilers to expedite their cases.
Nor do studies demonstrating that a quarter or more of young black males have some kind of criminal record prove a violent black disposition, since many of the offenses are for substance abuse and other nonviolent or even victimless crimes, while many of the violent crimes perpetrated by blacks are the work of a core group of recidivists who account for a disproportionately large share of the offenses.
In comparison with men, few women were apprehended or imprisoned for violent or property crimes.(56) Over 70% of imprisoned women were charged with public order offences compared with about half of the male prisoner population.(57) Of those women imprisoned for public order offences, most were convicted of vagrancy or drunkenness.(58) Vagrancy in particular was interpreted very broadly, including prostitution-related charges or offensive conduct, and could be used as a means of clearing the streets of bothersome individuals or women deemed to be acting in an unseemly manner.(59) Between 1880 and 1920, recidivists accounted for more than 70% of the female prisoner population, compared with one-third to one-half of the male.
Computation of preventive imprisonment for purposes of immediate release under this paragraph shall be the actual period of detention with good conduct time allowance: Provided, however, That if the accused is absent without justifiable cause at any stage of the trial, the court may motu proprio order the rearrest of the accused: Provided, finally, THAT RECIDIVISTS, HABITUAL DELINQUENTS, ESCAPEES AND PERSONS CHARGED WITH HEINOUS CRIMES ARE EXCLUDED FROM THE COVERAGE OF THIS ACT.
'In that same provision on preventive imprisonment, there was a line inserted that says that habitual delinquents, escapees, recidivists and those charged with heinous crimes are not covered by the provisions of this act,' he said.
However, inmates charged and convicted of heinous crimes, as well as those recidivists, habitual delinquents, and escapees, are excluded from the coverage of the law.
The law does not cover those found guilty of heinous crimes, escapees, habitual delinquents and recidivists.
That will affect some 30,000 offenders, many are recidivists, some with addictions and over 100 previous convictions.
Additionally, amnesty for foreigners who did not commit serious crimes and are not recidivists should be declared," he said.