reciprocity

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Related to Reciprocal relationship: Inverse relationship

rec·i·proc·i·ty

 (rĕs′ə-prŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. rec·i·proc·i·ties
1. A reciprocal condition or relationship.
2. A mutual or cooperative interchange of favors or privileges, especially the exchange of rights or privileges of trade between nations.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reciprocity

(ˌrɛsɪˈprɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ities
1. reciprocal action or relation
2. a mutual exchange of commercial or other privileges
[C18: via French from Latin reciprocus reciprocal]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rec•i•proc•i•ty

(ˌrɛs əˈprɒs ɪ ti)

n.
1. a reciprocal state or relation.
2. reciprocation; mutual exchange.
3. the policy in commercial dealings between countries by which corresponding advantages or privileges are granted by each country to the citizens of the other.
[1760–70; < Latin reciproc(us) (see reciprocal) + -ity]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Reciprocity

 

(See also COOPERATION.)

ka me, ka thee Do a good deed for another and the favor will be returned. This expression appeared in print as early as the mid-16th century. The exact origin is unknown and many variants were used interchangeably with ka, such as kaw, kae, k, kay, and kob. Scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours is a current analogous expression which like the proverbial Do unto others as you would have them do unto you implies reciprocity of service, flattery, or favors.

Ka me, ka thee, one good turn asketh another. (John Hey wood, Works, 1562)

logrolling The trading of votes or favors, especially among legislators, for mutual political gain; the policy of “you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.” In pioneer days a logrolling was a gathering at which neighbors helped each other roll and pile their logs to a particular spot for burning or other means of disposal. It was similar in nature to barn raisings and husking bees. Literal logrolling also played an important part in lumber camps where members of different camps often joined forces in rolling their logs to the water’s edge to catch the flood downstream. This U.S. term apparently came from the proverbial expression “you roll my log and I’ll roll yours.” Political use of the term dates from the early 19th century.

Territorial supreme courts have long since become known as a kind of log-rolling machine, in which the judges enter in the business of “you tickle me and I will tickle you.” (Weekly New Mexican Review, July, 1885)

one hand washes the other A proverbial expression originally denoting mutual cooperation in its positive sense only, but now carrying the negative connotations of backscratching, cronyism, and logrolling. It appeared as early as the 1500s in the former sense, but within a few centuries began to take on the latter dubious coloration.

Persons in business … who make, as the saying is, “one hand wash the other.” (Diary of Philip Hone, 1836)

Picturesque Expressions: A Thematic Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1980 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reciprocity - a relation of mutual dependence or action or influence
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
complementarity - the interrelation of reciprocity whereby one thing supplements or depends on the other; "the complementarity of the sexes"
correlation, correlativity - a reciprocal relation between two or more things
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
mutuality, mutualness - a reciprocality of sentiments; "the mutuality of their affection was obvious"
reciprocal - something (a term or expression or concept) that has a reciprocal relation to something else; "risk is the reciprocal of safety"
2.reciprocity - mutual exchange of commercial or other privileges
interchange, reciprocation, give-and-take - mutual interaction; the activity of reciprocating or exchanging (especially information)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

reciprocity

[ˌresɪˈprɒsɪtɪ] Nreciprocidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

reciprocity

n (of feelings, kindness etc)Gegenseitigkeit f; (of favours)Austausch m; (Pol) → Gegenseitigkeit f, → Reziprozität f (form)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

reciprocity

[ˌrɛsɪˈprɒsətɪ] nreciprocità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

rec·i·proc·i·ty

n. reciprocidad.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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