recluse

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rec·luse

 (rĕk′lo͞os′, rĭ-klo͞os′)
n.
A person who withdraws from the world to live in seclusion and often in solitude.
adj. re·cluse (rĭ-klo͞os′, rĕk′lo͞os′)
Withdrawn from the world; reclusive.

[Middle English, from Old French reclus, from Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere, to shut up : re-, re- + claudere, to close.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recluse

(rɪˈkluːs)
n
1. a person who lives in seclusion
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who lives in solitude to devote himself to prayer and religious meditation; a hermit, anchorite, or anchoress
adj
solitary; retiring
[C13: from Old French reclus, from Late Latin reclūdere to shut away, from Latin re- + claudere to close]
reclusion n
reˈclusive adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rec•luse

(ˈrɛk lus, rɪˈklus)

n.
1. a person who lives in seclusion or apart from society.
adj. re•cluse
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French reclus < Late Latin reclūsus, past participle of reclūdere to shut in, lock up]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recluse - one who lives in solituderecluse - one who lives in solitude    
lone hand, lone wolf, loner - a person who avoids the company or assistance of others
Adj.1.recluse - withdrawn from society; seeking solitude; "lived an unsocial reclusive life"
unsocial - not seeking or given to association; being or living without companions; "the unsocial disposition to neglect one's neighbors"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

recluse

noun hermit, solitary, ascetic, anchoress, monk, anchorite, eremite His widow became a virtual recluse for the remainder of her life.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

recluse

adjective
Solitary and shut off from society:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُنْعَزِل عن النّاس، ناسِك
-kasmolař
eneboer
einsetumaîur
vientuļnieks
samotár

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] Nsolitario/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nreclus(e) m/f, ermite m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

recluse

nEinsiedler(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

recluse

[rɪˈkluːs] nrecluso/a, eremita m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

recluse

(rəˈkluːs) noun
a person who lives alone and avoids other people.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
More than a century ago, the French geographer Elisee Reclus astutely predicted that people would always need "the dual possibility of gaining access to the delights of the city ...and, at the same time, the freedom that is nourished by nature." Reclus's ideal was visionary, if premature.
Drawing heavily from Elisee Reclus and Peter Kropotkin--central figures in both early geography and anarchism --Springer traces the myriad ways in which anarchist thought and practice has influenced geographical intellectual traditions.
By interrogating both recent works and original texts by early anarchist geographers who have greater influence on present-day literature such as Elisee Reclus (1830-1905) and Pyotr Kropotkin (1842-1921), I discuss the possible uses of a poststructuralist critique for this line of research by first challenging 'postanarchist' claims that so-called 'classical anarchism', allegedly biased by essentialist naturalism, should be entirely dismissed by contemporary scholarship.
He draws on Kropotkin and Reclus, in particular their theories of universal geography and mutual aid, to view space as relational, consisting of ongoing and reciprocating exchanges between actors, events, and ideas, and a communal sense of shared resources and land use.
[beaucoup plus grand que] [beaucoup moins que] Il refusait de tuer ses prisonniers, contrairement aux usages de l'epoque, et s'est efforce de bien les traiter [beaucoup plus grand que], a-t-il rappele, avant de noter qu'apres sa decision d'arreter ses hostilites avec l'armee coloniale francaise, [beaucoup moins que] il choisit de mener une vie de reclus et d'ascete [beaucoup plus grand que].
Following a chapter that briefly discusses the anarchists' intellectual heirs in modern anti-capitalist and Green politics, he presents chapters on Peter Kropotkin's thinking on revolution and mutual aid; the anti-statist libertarian English Individualists; the individualist anarchists; the development of communist anarchism among working class revolutionaries, British and European writers and activists involved with the Freedom group, and the Christian anarchists; and the ecological anarchism of Elisee Reclus and Patrick Geddes.
Au seuil de l'imploration nous sommes reclus. Casablanca n'est plus qu'un vin aigre sans compere.
Butterworth spends a good deal of time on Peter Kropotkin and Elisee Reclus, for example, two men who would proudly bear the title of anarchist but, for all their hatred of the status quo and desire for an end to the evils of capitalism, had nothing intentionally to do with bomb-throwers or assassins.
La diversitE[umlaut] culturelle et la solidaritE[umlaut] sont aujourd'hui les principaux thE mes promus par la francophonie.C'est sous la plume d'OnE[umlaut]sime Reclus qu'apparaEt le mot A1/2 francophonie e vers 1880 dans le cadre de sa rE[umlaut]flexion sur le destin colonial franE*ais.
The Work of Jose Maria Samper through the Eyes of Elisee Reclus