Recompensation


Also found in: Legal.

Re`com`pen`sa´tion


n.1.Recompense.
2.(Scots Law) Used to denote a case where a set-off pleaded by the defendant is met by a set-off pleaded by the plaintiff.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, along with the increasing requirement for excellent performance of sensors, especially in harsh environment, for example, high temperature, high shock, and high vibration, some recalibration or recompensation methods should be adopted to obtain a satisfying accuracy depending on the specific usage [3,4].
Likewise, the recompensation paid by the state to make up for villages burned during clashes with the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), also rooted in our place in the democratic system.
The way forward for both is defined more by gradualism than dramatic recompensation for the past.
The basis for using BNP or NT-proBNP in the management/therapy of patients with heart failure is predicated on the observation that their values frequently change in response to heart failure decompensation and recompensation (rising and then falling), and therapies used to treat heart failure typically lead to parallel reductions in BNP or NT-proBNP as the patient improves.
The prefix kele- is also prominent among ritual terms, such as kelelayaakng 'traditional recompensation (or "salary") given to a ritual specialist,' kelelemo 'cloths, jewelry,' or kelemutatn 'goods or provisions for the dead.
Its ally of decades may be its foe in the next year and recompensation of their sacrifice will not be entertained.
Combinations of spironolactone (up to 8 mg/kg/day), albumin infusions and sodium restriction could induce short-term recompensation, but the next step should be consideration for LT.
Recently, endovascular stent grafts have been shown to be an alternative definitive treatment option (18) and have been suggested as a potential 'bridging' procedure to allow cardiac recompensation, restoration of associated organ failure and reduction of perioperative risk for subsequent open repair.
Redistribution and recompensation are also powerful tools for addressing inequality.
The report presents evidence supporting recompensation claims for: social, cultural, economic, and political hardships and injuries as result of the loss of the material basis for sustaining health and self-sufficiency due to involuntary relocation and extensive contamination of terrestrial and marine resources; psychosocial stigmatization, pain, and suffering as a result of acute and long-term exposures to nuclear fallout; and pain and suffering as a result of the involvement of the people of Rongelap in long-term studies on the effects of radiation and their use as human subjects in a range of US government experiments disconnected from individual health and treatment needs.
An energy law of 7 December 2006 re-established regulated tariffs for industrial consumption in France and a recompensation system for suppliers.