reconstruction

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Related to Reconstruction era: Black codes

re·con·struc·tion

 (rē′kən-strŭk′shən)
n.
1. The act or result of reconstructing.
2. Reconstruction The period (1865-1877) during which the states that had seceded to the Confederacy were controlled by the federal government before being readmitted to the Union.

Reconstruction

(ˌriːkənˈstrʌkʃən)
n
(Historical Terms) history US the period after the Civil War when the South was reorganized and reintegrated into the Union (1865–77)

re•con•struc•tion

(ˌri kənˈstrʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of reconstructing.
2. (cap.)
a. the process by which the states that had seceded were reorganized as part of the Union after the Civil War.
b. the period during which this took place, 1865–77.
[1785–95]
re`con•struc′tion•al, re`con•struc′tion•ar′y, adj.

Reconstruction

The political process by which the southern states were restored to the Union.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reconstruction - the period after the American Civil War when the southern states were reorganized and reintegrated into the UnionReconstruction - the period after the American Civil War when the southern states were reorganized and reintegrated into the Union; 1865-1877
2.reconstruction - the activity of constructing something again
fixing, repair, mend, mending, reparation, fix, fixture - the act of putting something in working order again
makeover - a complete reconstruction and renovation of something; "the blighted neighborhood underwent a total makeover"
reassembly, refabrication - assembling again
re-formation, regeneration - forming again (especially with improvements or removal of defects); renewing and reconstituting
rebuilding - building again
3.reconstruction - an interpretation formed by piecing together bits of evidence
interpretation - an explanation that results from interpreting something; "the report included his interpretation of the forensic evidence"
4.reconstruction - recall that is hypothesized to work by storing abstract features which are then used to construct the memory during recall
recollection, reminiscence, recall - the process of remembering (especially the process of recovering information by mental effort); "he has total recall of the episode"

reconstruction

noun
1. rebuilding, reform, restoration, remake, remodelling, regeneration, renovation, reorganization, re-creation, re-establishment America's part in the post-war reconstruction of Germany.
2. re-enactment, account, piecing-together a reconstruction of her ordeal
Translations
إعادَة بِناء
rekonstrukce
rekonstruktion
rekonstruktiorekonstruointi
rekonstrukcióújjáépítés
endurgerî
yeniden tasarlama

reconstruction

[ˈriːkənˈstrʌkʃən] Nreconstrucción f

reconstruction

[ˌriːkənˈstrʌkʃən] n
(= renewal, reinvigoration) [country] → reconstruction f
(= rebuilding) [building, road, city] → reconstruction f
(= recreation) [crime, event] → reconstitution f
(MEDICINE) [breast, face] → reconstruction f

reconstruction

nRekonstruktion f; (of city, building)Wiederaufbau m

reconstruction

[ˌriːkənˈstrʌkʃn] nricostruzione f

reconstruct

(riːkənˈstrakt) verb
to create a complete description or idea, on the basis of certain known facts. Let us try to reconstruct the crime.
ˌreconˈstruction (-ʃən) noun

re·con·struc·tion

v. reconstrucción.

reconstruction

n reconstrucción f
References in periodicals archive ?
As the country lurched into the Reconstruction era, former slaves continued to push for their inalienable rights.
Published in the journal Proceedings of the South Carolina Historical Association between 1938 and 2010, the 23 articles in this volume discuss topics related to South Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction era. They focus on political figures and their policies (Abraham Lincoln, governor Francis W.
Harrold argues that the impact of the abolitionists extended beyond the demise of slavery, stretching into the Reconstruction era and later as the struggle for racial justice and black equality continued.
Miller Jr.'s Gullah Stateman is an extremely well documented and informative biography of Robert Smalls, the African-American Civil War hero and Reconstruction era politician from South Carolina.
When she turns to post-Civil War writing, Foster makes another observation that I find particularly significant: "Historians, economists, and political scientists have long acknowledged what literary scholars have not, that the years between 1865 and 1877, commonly known as the Reconstruction era, were largely shaped by concerns about the role of black people in American social systems.
Covering both Northern and Southern perspectives during the Reconstruction era after the Civil War, the book begins with a narrative overview from slavery and the Civil War through the Civil Rights movement and the legacy of Reconstruction.
The book includes photographs of mixed-race individuals who chose to "pass" as Black in the post-Civil War Reconstruction era.
He displays some misconceptions, however, as, for example, he reveals his belief that the "carpetbaggers" of the Reconstruction era were, in fact, traveling salesmen.
MILLER JR.'s GULLAH STATESMAN IS AN EXTREMELY well documented and informative biography of Robert Smalls, the African-American Civil War hero and Reconstruction era politician from South Carolina.
Organized encyclopedically, the text covers a wide variety of topics relating to the Reconstruction Era of 1863 to 1877.
In this new survey, Brooks Simpson returns to a familiar theme, Reconstruction era leadership.
From Ernest Hemingway and Ralph Ellison to the Reconstruction era in general and the convict-hire system that helped make Reconstruction so unconstructive for so many, and from the black and white writers of Twain's time, and earlier, to William Faulkner and various efforts, black as well as white, to get the South and the matter of race stated, this compact volume moves from its initial insight into the cadences of Jimmy's speech as Twain recreated them on the page, first for Livy and then for the New York Times, to a consideration of what Twain's Huck owes to the real-life Jimmy.

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