recusant

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rec·u·sant

 (rĕk′yə-zənt, rĭ-kyo͞o′-)
n.
1. One of the Roman Catholics in England who incurred legal and social penalties in the 1500s and afterward for refusing to attend services of the Church of England.
2. A dissenter; a nonconformist.

rec′u·san·cy n.
rec′u·sant adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

recusant

(ˈrɛkjʊzənt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
2. (Roman Catholic Church) (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
3. any person who refuses to submit to authority
adj
4. (Historical Terms) (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
5. (Roman Catholic Church) (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
6. refusing to submit to authority
[C16: from Latin recūsāns refusing, from recūsāre from re- + causārī to dispute, from causa a cause]
ˈrecusance, ˈrecusancy n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rec•u•sant

(ˈrɛk yə zənt, rɪˈkyu zənt)
n.
1. (in 16th to 18th century England) a person, esp. a Roman Catholic, who refused to attend the services of the Church of England.
2. a person who refuses to submit, comply, etc.
adj.
3. of or characteristic of a recusant.
[1545–55; < Latin recūsant- (s. of recūsāns), present participle of recusāre to demur, object =re- re- + -cūsāre, v. derivative of causa cause]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recusant - someone who refuses to conform to established standards of conduct
beatnik, beat - a member of the beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior
bohemian - a nonconformist writer or artist who lives an unconventional life
dissenter, dissident, objector, protester, contestant - a person who dissents from some established policy
enfant terrible - a person whose unconventional behavior embarrasses others
heretic - a person who holds unorthodox opinions in any field (not merely religion)
maverick, rebel - someone who exhibits great independence in thought and action
Adj.1.recusant - (of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
unorthodox - breaking with convention or tradition; "an unorthodox lifestyle"
2.recusant - refusing to submit to authority; "the recusant electors...cooperated in electing a new Senate"- Mary W.Williams
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

recusant

[ˈrekjʊzənt]
A. ADJrecusante
B. Nrecusante mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

recusant

adj (Rel Hist) → der/die sich weigert, dem anglikanischen Gottesdienst beizuwohnen; (fig liter)renitent
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
My cognizance of the pit had become known to the inquisitorial agents -- the pit whose horrors had been destined for so bold a recusant as myself -- the pit, typical of hell, and regarded by rumor as the Ultima Thule of all their punishments.
Joshua Rann, who gave out his bass notes with unusual complacency and threw an extra ray of severity into the glances he sent over his spectacles at the recusant Will Maskery.
Part 1 covers English recusants in the print culture of the in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and Part 2 examines the role of subversive publishing on the intellectual culture of the Elizabethan Settlement.
In all of Elizabeth's reign, only thirteen convicted recusants could pay the 260 [pounds sterling] per lunar year that the crown demanded.
Helen Hackett's study of Huntington Library, MS MH 904 offers a convincing attribution of the 'Hand B Scribe', and will be of interest to scholars of English recusants. Hackett also provides a detailed survey of how one volume changed over time, with a formerly quite domestic text reconfigured by the deliberate filling of blank pages.
Many of these novels celebrated the Protestant martyrs under the reign of Mary Tudor, but these eventually evoked narratives of recusants who risked their lives to reject biblicism in favor of the sacramental historical Catholic church, previewing what was to become a "new Counter-Reformation" (143).
Marotti closely examines a number of Marian verses that extend through the reigns of Queen Elizabeth, King James I, and King Charles I to claim that: "Through the Elizabethan period and beyond, during England's slow religious transition from Catholicism to Protestantism the figure of Mary could be invoked by Catholic recusants and religious conservatives to proclaim religious resistance to what was officially being imposed on the country and what was anthropologically changing on a grassroots level.
Timothy Wilks delineates expertly the dense filigree that embedded Clanricard in courtly life and linked him with aristocratic trend-setters and aesthetic recusants. With equal assurance, Bernadette Cunningham elucidates the Irish background.
Table 1 is based on the records found in NRQSM 2/2 fos 198v-202v; the names of hosts known to be Catholic recusants or Catholic sympathisers are shown in bold.
It seems that the present manuscript remained in the hands of Lady Joan's family, Vaux of Harrowden, throughout the 16th century, and was hidden when that family became Recusants and supporters of the gunpowder plot.
For many years, I have seen the jockeying for power, competitions for the limelight and the recusants at the back of the class.
Here she argues that as the Protestant ethos came to dominate official state position, which dictated the suppression of images and ornaments, Catholic recusants came to cherish these items more ardently.