red dwarf

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Related to Red dwarfs: White dwarfs, Brown dwarfs

red dwarf

n.
A dwarf star, ranging in mass from one-tenth to one-half the mass of the sun, whose relatively cool surface temperature makes it appear red-orange in color.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

red dwarf

n
(Celestial Objects) one of a class of small cool main-sequence stars
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

red′ dwarf′


n.
any of the faint reddish stars smaller than the sun and with low surface temperatures, about 2000–3000 K.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

red dwarf

A star that is cool, small, and very faint. Red dwarfs burn very slowly and live for about 100 billion years. Although they are difficult to see, they are likely the most abundant type of star. Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.red dwarf - a small, old, relatively cool star; approximately 100 times the mass of Jupiter
flare star - a red dwarf star in which luminosity can change several magnitudes in a few minutes
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
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References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Flares from the youngest red dwarfs surveyed are 100 to 1,000 times more energetic than when the stars are older.
The few planets with a radius about three times that of Earth were found orbiting the most metal-rich red dwarfs."
These stars, known as red dwarfs, are of enormous interest for studies of planetary formation and evolution, the study states.
Red dwarfs have tightly bound "habitable zones" - the narrow temperature belts where surface water can exist as a liquid - but are also prone to deadly eruptions of ultraviolet radiation and X-rays.
A NEW STUDY of data archived from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) spacecraft reveals how hard life might be on exoplanets orbiting red dwarfs.
Red dwarfs are smaller, cooler and fainter than our solar system's sun-and they are also the most commonly found stars in our galaxy, making up about three of every four stars in the Milky Way.
But red dwarfs don't burn as brightly, so Earthlings must use a telescope to see Gliese 581.
But unlike the sun, red dwarfs don't shine in the sky.
This line, which extended from the hot luminous stars to the cool dim ones, was called the Main Sequence, because about 95 percent of the stars, including the red dwarfs, fell upon it.
LHS 1140 might prove to be special compared to other red dwarfs with exoplanets, Dittmann argues.
"Most of the planets in the Milky Way orbit red dwarfs," Nicolas Cowan, a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern's Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, said.