redshift

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red shift

or red·shift (rĕd′shĭft′)
n.
An increase in the wavelength of radiation emitted by a receding celestial object as a consequence of the Doppler effect.

[From the fact that the longer wavelengths of light are at the red end of the visible spectrum.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

redshift

(ˈrɛdˌʃɪft)
n
(Astronomy) a shift in the lines of the spectrum of an astronomical object towards a longer wavelength (the red end of an optical spectrum), relative to the wavelength of these lines in the terrestrial spectrum, usually as a result of the Doppler effect caused by the recession of the object. Compare: blueshift
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

red•shift

(ˈrɛdˌʃɪft)

n.
a shift in the spectrum of a celestial object toward longer wavelengths, caused by the object's movement away from the viewer.
[1920–25]
red′shift`ed, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.redshift - (astronomy) a shift in the spectra of very distant galaxies toward longer wavelengths (toward the red end of the spectrum); generally interpreted as evidence that the universe is expanding
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
propagation - the movement of a wave through a medium
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