red supergiant

(redirected from Red supergiants)

red supergiant

n.
A massive star of great size and luminosity that has a relatively low surface temperature ranging from 3,000 to 4,000 kelvin (4,940° to 5,740° F), giving it a reddish or orange hue.
References in periodicals archive ?
pdf) Nature that there is currently no explanation for why the gas is moving so turbulently, raising a question in our understanding of how red supergiants operate.
They are divided into red supergiants, orange supergiants, and blue supergiants according to their surface temperatures.
Other topics include mask design, reverberation mapping, radio surveys, red supergiants in the Magellanic clouds, and automatic spectral classification of galaxies in the infrared.
It's one of the largest and most luminous red supergiants known, and it's also one of the reddest that's not a carbon star.
In 2011, two of these massive red supergiants exploded while in Kepler's view.
The last supernova discovered by NASA specialists was in 2011, when two red supergiants exploded which was viewed through Kepler, according to NASA's bulletin.
The blue supergiants Rigel and Deneb make a wonderful contrast with the red supergiants Betelgeuse (Orion's left shoulder) and Antares (in Scorpius, far south of Cygnus).
TZOs are hard to find because they look nearly identical to other red supergiants.
Thorne-Zytkow objects (TZOs) are hybrids of red supergiant and neutron stars that superficially resemble normal red supergiants, such as Betelguese in the constellation Orion.
Red supergiants are extremely large stars that weigh in at a minimum of 15 times that of the sun, and they are the largest stars dwelling in our cosmos by volume.
Abstract: Red supergiants (RSGs) represent a crucial phase in the evolution of high-mass stars.
Thus, 119 Tauri remains firmly in second place in the league of all known red supergiants (which excludes carbon stars) and some have even started to refer to this star as the Ruby Star after my lead.