red wiggler


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Related to red wiggler: Vermiculture, Eisenia fetida

red wiggler

n.
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For comparative analysis, mature municipal solid waste compost (7 months old) from Fundy Compost (Brookfield, Nova Scotia) and vermicompost (6 months old) produced by red wiggler worms (Eisenia fetida) from Cathy's Crawly Composters (Bradford, Ontario) were the other treatments used in the study.
Each tower received a handful of shredded paper, a cup of compost, and a handful of red wiggler worms.
Fontburn: Ledgered PowerBait Red Wiggler worms and Neon Blue paste Kielder: PowerBait, worm
In a composter small enough for even the tiniest studio apartment, red wiggler worms, widely available online, process food waste, which is then cured and used to enrich soil.
In the common red wiggler worm, the loss of eight segments or less is probably no big deal; but if the cut comes between 8 and 13 segments, the worm might be able to regrow some of its head, but not its sexual organs (which yes, are in the head 6 both ovary and testis).
You'll need two 8-to-10-gallon plastic storage tubs with lids, a drill, newspaper, a large piece of cardboard, four bricks, garden dirt, and a pound of red wiggler worms.
2) To ensure that you have a worm species suitable for composting with, you will need to purchase your red wiggler worms.
But these weren't ordinary worms; these were Eiseniafetida, or red wiggler worms, which compost food scraps five times more efficiently than ordinary earthworms.
Grossman & Toby Weitzel's Recycle With Earthworms: The Red Wiggler Connection (0914116320, $10.00) comes from a certified Master Composter who has developed this book and its accompanying video for use in classrooms and recycling programs.
An infantryman that walked across France carrying a mortar, he sat here cackling every time a pudgy little fish sucked up a red wiggler and turned on his side to run.
Depending on whom you talk to, somewhere between 12 and 20 species from Europe and Asia burrow in our soil - species like Eisenia Andrei, the red wiggler; Eisenia hortensis, the European red worm; and Lumbricus terrestris, the Canadian nightcrawler.
CUTLINE: Olivia Catalini, 5, of Lunenburg, deposits a freshly chosen red wiggler worm into her plastic container as she and her family assemble a worm bin yesterday at the Lunenburg Public Library.