reed warbler

(redirected from Reed warblers)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

reed warbler

n
(Animals) any of various common Old World warblers of the genus Acrocephalus, esp A. scirpaceus, that inhabit marshy regions and have a brown plumage
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

reed warbler

nRohrsänger m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
In summer the reed bed on your right is full of reed warblers and sedge warblers.
In summer the reedbed on your right is full of chattering reed warblers and sedge warblers.
Activists say the most common species in the traps are Blackcaps, Lesser Whitethroat, Garden Warblers, Nightingales, and Reed Warblers, all long distant-migrants with populations declining in most EU countries.
Walking around RSPB Conwy, there were lots of Chiffchaffs, Willow, Sedge and Reed Warblers away from their nesting habitats, perhaps indicating that they are birds on the move.
Willow warblers in the woods, reed warblers by the sides of lakes and ponds and the wonderfully melodious blackcap, which can appear in your garden.
From the reedbeds Clamorous Reed Warblers clamored loudly, but even from a kayak it was hard to get a glimpse of the bird.
Broadcasting live, the oftenspotted Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and Martin Hughes-Games, pictured, plan to study as many species as possible, including playful otters, breeding puffins, 'singing' seals and reed warblers.
Broadcasting live, the often-spotted Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan and Martin Hughes-Games plan to study as many species as possible, including playful otters, breeding puffins, "singing" seals and reed warblers.
The lake is also excellent for wildlife and supports healthy populations of water voles, reed warblers and hunting hobbies."
(nymphs) (127 [0.8%]) on great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) (9.7% of banded birds) and on European robins (Erithacus rubecula) (0.5% of banded birds), respectively.
Thus, the spatial pattern of nest predation is an important territory quality parameter that can give secondary female Great Reed Warblers compensation for the cost of sharing territories with other females, and hence explains the occurrence of polygyny.