reflexive verb

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reflexive verb

Reflexive verbs are verbs whose subjects are also their direct objects—that is, the action of the verb is both committed and received by the same person or thing. Reflexive verbs are sometimes identified as being in the “middle voice” (as opposed to the active voice or the passive voice).
Reflexive verbs can most easily be identified by the use of reflexive pronouns, which are used as the direct object and refer back to the subject of the sentence.
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Noun1.reflexive verb - a verb whose agent performs an action that is directed at the agent; "the sentence `he washed' has a reflexive verb"; "`perjure' is a reflexive verb because you cannot perjure anyone but yourself"
verb - a content word that denotes an action, occurrence, or state of existence
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
refleksiiviverbi
povratni glagol
afturbeygð sögn
wederkerend werkwoord
References in periodicals archive ?
The following sample lesson on the teaching of reflexive verbs has been taken from our first-year text, Juntos: Italian for Speakers of English and Spanish in which we have applied the theories discussed above.
Sufficient quantity-that is, the meaning 'enough'-is conveyed by a few reflexive verbs; for example, the consumption verbs najesti se 'eat enough; eat one's fill', narucati se 'finish lunch, lunch one's fill', and navecerati se 'finish/ have an ample supper'.
Maria's Language Learning Center also has specialized English classes for non-native speakers, plus special classes on specific topics, such as classes on Spanish reflexive verbs and pronouns, for those students who need a review.
Russi describes the controversial status of gli, 3rd plural indirect object pronoun that often replaces the nonclitic form loro, and the variety of functions of the clitic si, which are categorized as pronominal (3rd singular reflexive and reciprocal pronoun and impersonal si) and nonpronominal (passive marker, ergative, marker of inherently reflexive verbs without a nonreflexive counterpart, and aspectual/completive si with verbs of physical and psychological consumption).
In the languages that lack the definite conjugation the distribution of the suffix is confined to some more limited sphere of conjugation, e.g., to some forms of transitive or reflexive verbs; besides, in that case the suffix often occurs in the imperative, optative or desiderative and conjunctive forms ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 1985 : 329).
Hendriksen (1986: 142f.) discusses under the heading "involitive and reflexive verbs" various sentence types out of which the following are, in my opinion, all reflexive.
For example, the students review reflexive verbs after reading a page that contains seven examples of reflexive verbs in one paragraph.
Another aspect of verbs that FR mentions is the use of reflexive verbs (that is, verbs used with a form of personal pronoun, for example, s'ouvrir).
The prevalence of transitive, intransitive, and reflexive verbs are reported in Table 2.
(...) Reflexive verbs, both transitive and intransitive, are always conjugated with essere.
The so-called "reflexive pronoun" sich that accompanies these verbs is an instance of the purely grammatical marker that accompanies inherently reflexive verbs. When these verbs combine with a plural subject the relevant prepositional phrase (miteinander 'with each other') is generally omissible: