reinvention


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

reinvention

(ˌriːɪnˈvɛnʃən)
n
the act or an instance of replacing a product, etc with an entirely new version
Translations

reinvention

[ˌriːɪnˈvɛnʃən] nréinvention f
References in periodicals archive ?
Properly executed, these ideas are the dynamo that will drive the company's reinvention.
But his recent offering shows how he has once again managed a return to his source and a reinvention of his project, emerging as a conceptualist with a soft spot for the hands-on and as an appropriationist playing an ongoing, multifaceted game of exquisite corpse in which the authors of the books, the authors of the cards, and the authors of their anonymous annotations and alterations could never have known they'd participate.
SARAH Ferguson's reinvention from overweight "social embarrassment" to successful svelte businesswoman is complete.
Night Shyamalan's low-key reinvention of the superhero genre because the writer/director of The Sixth Sense provides the suspense in this psychological thriller by focusing on what happens to a very ordinary guy when he discovers he just might have the strength of 10 and an otherworldly mission to protect and serve.
This is the most comprehensive reinvention of the product line since its inception more than a decade ago," said Al Zollar, general manager, IBM eServer iSeries.
2) Thus, throughout the novels that make up the Bloodworth Trilogy--There Is A Tree More Ancient Than Eden, The Bloodworth Orphans, and Two Wings to Veil My Face--Forrest uses the gospel impulse (3) and its magical use of reinvention as an art form to address the theme that permeates his novels: the transformation of the self as an act essential to survival during spiritual agony.
Today, HUD is held up as a model of successful government reinvention.
In an urban setting, surrounded by stately homes and Mission-style bungalows, the architectural reinvention of Rockwood Health and Wellness Center is nothing short of dramatic.
An interagency team produced three reinvention white papers containing twenty-two formal recommendations for improvement.
After extensive debate about and implementation of various concepts of new public management (NPM)(1) during the last decade, public management scholars have recently turned to the evaluation of theoretical frameworks and reinvention efforts in a more critical and objective manner (Lynn 1998b; Peters and Savoie 1998; Kettl 1998).
DeMarco variously defines slack as the natural enemy of efficiency, the lubricant of change, "a prescription for building a capacity to change into the modern enterprise" and "the time when reinvention happens.