interpretability

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in·ter·pret

 (ĭn-tûr′prĭt)
v. in·ter·pret·ed, in·ter·pret·ing, in·ter·prets
v.tr.
1. To explain the meaning of: The newspapers interpreted the ambassador's speech as an attempt at making peace. See Synonyms at explain.
2. To understand the significance of; construe: interpreted his smile to be an agreement; interpreted the open door as an invitation.
3. To present or conceptualize the meaning of by means of art or criticism: The actor interpreted the character with great subtlety.
4. To translate from one language into another: interpreted the ambassador's remarks for the assembly.
v.intr.
To serve as an interpreter for speakers of different languages.

[Middle English interpreten, from Old French interpreter, from Latin interpretārī, from interpres, interpret-, negotiator, explainer; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

in·ter′pret·a·bil′i·ty, in·ter′pret·a·ble·ness n.
in·ter′pret·a·ble adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

interpretability

Suitability of imagery for interpretation with respect to answering adequately requirements on a given type of target in terms of quality and scale. a. poor--Imagery is unsuitable for interpretation to answer adequately requirements on a given type of target. b. fair--Imagery is suitable for interpretation to answer requirements on a given type of target but with only average detail. c. good--Imagery is suitable for interpretation to answer requirements on a given type of target in considerable detail. d. excellent--Imagery is suitable for interpretation to answer requirements on a given type of target in complete detail.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the relative interpretation, an individual's fair share of opportunity refers, by definition, to other people's opportunities.
Now, although it is the most familiar interpretation of equality of opportunity, the relative interpretation is not strictly compulsory.
In fact, we argue, those who advocate for an absolute interpretation nonetheless maintain an understanding of clinical equipoise that is formally similar to a relative interpretation of minimal risk for an important class of research--a class that captures much of clinical research activities with vulnerable populations.
The Canadian Tri-Council Policy Statement explicitly adopts a relative interpretation of "risks of daily living:" ...
In English, as in many languages, the relative interpretation of negation and quantified NPs does not always mirror the
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