synaptic vesicle

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synaptic vesicle

n.
Any of several small, intracellular, membrane-bound vesicles at a synaptic junction of neurons that contain a neurotransmitter.
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(1,2) These effects occur when pregabalin binds to presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels to regulate calcium entry into the cell, thereby reducing the release of neurotransmitters such as glutamate, norepinephrine, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide.
Central in this information transfer is the release of neurotransmitters at chemical synapses.
The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, showed that in neurons calcium plays a role in the release of neurotransmitters. They also found a fine balance between calcium and alpha-synuclein in the cell.
'The benefits could come from the release of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, during sex,' says Marilyn.
Studies in humans and animals have provided background evidence that exercise increases the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and norepinephrine that are important in the pathophysiology of ADHD.
Heparin also stimulates AgRP neurons to fire electric impulses and release of neurotransmitters.
These effects appear to be related to the stimulated release of neurotransmitters including dopamine, serotonin, and/or noradrenaline [1,10], with noradrenaline acting via alpha-1 receptors in arterial vasculature to stimulate vasoconstriction and via beta-1 receptors to increase cardiac contractility and heart rate [11], leading to hypertension and tachycardia, and promoting cardiac ischaemia.
With further evolution and remodeling, the researchers believe that the artificial neurons could be placed inside the body and trigger the release of neurotransmitters at far away sites.
With aging there tends to be brain shrinkage and a decline in the release of neurotransmitters, which are brain chemicals that help communicate information.
"Once the botulinum toxin gets into the terminal nerve, it will prevent the release of neurotransmitters, particularly acetylcholine; when acetylcholine is not released, there is less of a trigger for the bladder to contract," he explained.
After Flakka is consumed either orally, snorted, injected or smoked, the drug rapidly crosses the protective blood-brain barrier and begins to flood the brain with the release of neurotransmitters, activating the reward center of the brain and producing a sense of euphoria similar to that of methamphetamine and cocaine.
This activity is directly related to the release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic cell.