sharing economy

(redirected from Remix culture)
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sharing economy

n
(Economics) an economic system, or part of one, in which goods are rented or borrowed directly from individuals rather than from businesses
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Lessig must acknowledge that producers of remix culture will not be able
It discusses adaptations on streaming services like Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix; audience and fan-driven adaptations of remix culture and how ownership rights played a role in defining adaptive practice; game adaptations; and live-action adaptations on Broadway and in theme parks.
New media theory provides an articulation of how a networked society affects life: the authors identify terms such as "remix culture" (media products are never final cuts) and "publicized privacy" (both voluntarily through Pinterest and involuntarily through surveillance technology).
Stiegler's approach to the film will be contrasted with the 'remix culture' perspective articulated by Lawrence Lessig, showing how the cultural and political stakes here go beyond questions of intellectual property.
Thirty years ago, remix culture began to change the way people think about music.
Expect to see more companies offering their own solutions to the problems of copyright and remix culture.
Configurable culture is similar to remix culture in terms of originality, uniqueness, and authenticity, but the creativity of mash-up runs much deeper and is more complicated than remixing.
This documentary remains a smart look at all of the questions surrounding remix culture, and will only continue to be more relevant as technology and our access to it keeps changing.
However, in contrast to both the art of bricolage exhibited at museums and the musical remix culture, the YouTube Mashups as audiovisual expressions cannot easily be placed within the traditional distinction between high/low or good/bad art, as they consist of a melting pot of fully accessible content that cannot be defined in a clear-cut conventional system of cultural categorization.
85) that is reminiscent of today's remix culture. Flusser is not positive about the change he is theorising.