renegado


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renegado

(ˌrɛnɪˈɡɑːdəʊ)
n, pl -dos
an archaic word for renegade
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Trap-robber, horse-thief, squaw-man, renegado - Hank Butters - I know him very well.
This was a Blackfoot renegado, named Kosato, a fiery hot-blooded youth who, with a beautiful girl of the same tribe, had taken refuge among the Nez Perces.
A Recovery from Apostasy: Set out in A Sermon Preached in Stepney Church neere London at the receiving of a penitent, Renegado in to the Church, Octob.
Rochester discusses pieces of visual art as spectatorial objects for the onstage audience in The Renegado (1624) and The Emperor of the East (1631); she closes with attention to the magical miniature in The Picture (1629).
It's a little odd that more than half of a book on tragicomedy would be devoted to Shakespeare, with only one Fletcher play treated at any length, but Forman's rich discussions of Fletcher's The Island Princess and Philip Massinger's The Renegado nonetheless highlight the vitality of English tragicomedy beyond the Shakespearean romance.
121)--and in Massinger's The Renegado (1623/4), described as intended to 'showcase the inventiveness of [Thomas Mun's] balance of trade theory', while also intriguingly addressing moral anxieties about the potential inequity of making 'too much profit' (p.