terraforming

(redirected from Replacing the Earth)

ter·ra·form

 (tĕr′ə-fôrm′)
tr.v. ter·ra·formed, ter·ra·form·ing, ter·ra·forms
To transform (a landscape) on another planet into one having the characteristics of landscapes on Earth.

[Latin terra, earth; see terrace + form.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

terraforming

(ˈtɛrəˌfɔːmɪŋ)
n
(Astronomy) planetary engineering designed to enhance the capacity of an extraterrestrial planetary environment to sustain life
[C20: from Latin terra earth + forming]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
إعادة تأهيل
terraformace
Terraforming
maankaltaistaminen
terraformationterraforming
הארצה
テラフォーミング
테라포밍
terraformowanie
terraformação
References in periodicals archive ?
The funding will help bring the Dead House back to life, by restoring leaded glass windows, protecting masonry which contains 19th century graffiti and replacing the earth floor with one made from re-used headstones.
Other areas, where the radiation was not so critically high, took steps such as replacing the earth in parks and school playgrounds, decontaminating public spaces like sidewalks, and limiting children's outdoor play time.
The ESMA said that for class-II appliances where earthing terminals are not required, the same plug configuration is required with a dummy plastic of metal pin replacing the earth terminals to maintaining the plug's compatibility with the sockets.
'For class II appliances where earthing terminals are not required, the same plug configuration is required with a dummy plastic or metal pin replacing the earth terminals to maintain the plug compatibility with the socket outlets,' said the official.
The mammoth concrete structures are continuously replacing the earth's forest cover and over a period of last fifty years, half of the world's original forest cover has been lost to the various human activities.
In this collection of essays contributors describe how to reduce material consumption while still boosting the bottom line, a process that starts to make sense as soon as you understand the cost of replacing the earth. Writing as a team, they describe ecologically and socially sound services (such as home services) that are also economically appropriate, samples of innovative home services and their sustainability effects, conditions for the demand for sustainable household services, providers of home services, positive and negative factors affecting home services, business models, service development, and in a very upbeat chapter, the art of rediscovering immaterial pleasures.