replication

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rep·li·ca·tion

 (rĕp′lĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of replicating something.
b. Biology The process by which genetic material, a single-celled organism, or a virus reproduces or makes a copy of itself.
c. In scientific research, the repetition of an experiment to confirm findings or to ensure accuracy.
d. A copy or reproduction: a replication of a famous painting.
2. Law The plaintiff's response to the defendant's answer or plea; a reply.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

replication

(ˌrɛplɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. a reply or response
2. (Law) law (formerly) the plaintiff's reply to a defendant's answer or plea
3. (Biology) biology the production of exact copies of complex molecules, such as DNA molecules, that occurs during growth of living organisms
4. repetition of a procedure, such as a scientific experiment, in order to reduce errors
5. a less common word for replica
[C14: via Old French from Latin replicātiō a folding back, from replicāre to unroll; see reply]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rep•li•ca•tion

(ˌrɛp lɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a reply; answer.
2. the reply of a plaintiff to a defendant's plea or answer.
3. reverberation; echo.
4. copy; replica.
5. the act or process of replicating, esp. in a scientific experiment.
6. the process by which double-stranded DNA makes copies of itself, each strand, as it separates, synthesizing a complementary strand.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.replication - the act of making copies; "Gutenberg's reproduction of holy texts was far more efficient"
scanning - the act of systematically moving a finely focused beam of light or electrons over a surface in order to produce an image of it for analysis or transmission
copying - an act of copying
sound reproduction - the reproduction of sound
2.replication - (genetics) the process whereby DNA makes a copy of itself before cell division
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
3.replication - a quick reply to a question or remark (especially a witty or critical one); "it brought a sharp rejoinder from the teacher"
back talk, backtalk, sass, sassing, lip, mouth - an impudent or insolent rejoinder; "don't give me any of your sass"
reply, response - the speech act of continuing a conversational exchange; "he growled his reply"
4.replication - (law) a pleading made by a plaintiff in reply to the defendant's plea or answer
pleading - (law) a statement in legal and logical form stating something on behalf of a party to a legal proceeding
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
5.replication - the repetition of a sound resulting from reflection of the sound wavesreplication - the repetition of a sound resulting from reflection of the sound waves; "she could hear echoes of her own footsteps"
reflectivity, reflexion, reflection - the ability to reflect beams or rays
re-echo - the echo of an echo
6.replication - copy that is not the originalreplication - copy that is not the original; something that has been copied
copy - a thing made to be similar or identical to another thing; "she made a copy of the designer dress"; "the clone was a copy of its ancestor"
toy - a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"
7.replication - the repetition of an experiment in order to test the validity of its conclusion; "scientists will not believe an experimental result until they have seen at least one replication"
repeating, repetition - the act of doing or performing again
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

replication

noun
Something closely resembling another:
Archaic: simulacre.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

rep·li·ca·tion

n. reproducción, duplicación.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
As the DNA strands separate and copy, they form a "replication fork." If these forks run into obstacles like lesions that block their progress, cells perform a maneuver called fork reversal.
Biochemists and biologists from around the world offer 35 articles in various areas of biochemistry, such as protein misfolding diseases, amyloid proteins at the molecular level, the mechanisms and functions of spatial protein quality control, regulated protein degradation and the ubiquitin system and autophagy, ubiquitin ligases, mechanisms of deubiquitinase specificity and regulation, proteasomal and autophagic degradation systems, mechanisms of autophagy initiation, the systems biology of metabolism, metabolite measurement, isocitrate dehydrogenase and cancer therapeutics, tools for patchy switching in biology, the biochemistry of reductive dehalogenation, electric fields and enzyme catalysis, the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, and the telomerase mechanism of telomere synthesis.
For example, the FANCM protein detects the stalled replication fork caused by interstrand crosslinks (ICLs); the MRN complex is the typical sensor of DSBs during S/G2 phase; the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer is the primary DSBs sensor during G1, while replication protein A (RPA) overcoats single-strand DNA (ssDNA) found either at processed DSB overhangs to be repaired by HR or at stalled replication forks [13].
In a subsequent S phase, if the cells face accidental problems such as replication fork stalling or disassembly, they cannot be retrieved.
For the "leading strand" DNA, replication proceeds continuously in the 5' to 3' direction along with the replication fork as it is unwound by helicases.
Studies performed using 2-dimensional gel analyses of replication intermediates indicate that replication fork stalling at inverted repeats is caused by hairpin structures.
What occurs when the replication fork collides against this unusual structure?
of the "replication fork"--where for a time there are four DNA
Modulation of RNA polymerase by (P) ppGpp reveals a RecG-dependent mechanism for replication fork progression.
For DNA gyrase, this topoisomerization reaction results in introduction (or removal) of DNA supercoils, thus affecting the negative supercoiling of DNA necessary to initiate DNA replication and remove positive supercoils that accumulate before an advancing replication fork. For topoisomerase IV, the topoisomerization reaction results in separation of the interlocking of daughter DNA strands that develop during replication; this facilitates the segregation of daughter DNA molecules into daughter cells.