repression

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re·pres·sion

 (rĭ-prĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of repressing or the state of being repressed.
2. Psychology The unconscious exclusion of painful impulses, desires, or fears from the conscious mind.

re·pres′sion·ist adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

repression

(rɪˈprɛʃən)
n
1. the act or process of repressing or the condition of being repressed
2. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal the subconscious rejection of thoughts and impulses that conflict with conventional standards of conduct. See suppression2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

re•pres•sion

(rɪˈprɛʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of repressing; state of being repressed.
2. the suppression from consciousness of distressing or disagreeable ideas, memories, feelings, or impulses.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

repression

Involuntary ejection of shameful emotions and memories from consciousness because they are too painful to bear; it may sometimes result in neurotic symptoms.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.repression - a state of forcible subjugation; "the long repression of Christian sects"
subjection, subjugation - forced submission to control by others
2.repression - (psychiatry) the classical defense mechanism that protects you from impulses or ideas that would cause anxiety by preventing them from becoming conscious
psychiatry, psychological medicine, psychopathology - the branch of medicine dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders
defence, defence mechanism, defence reaction, defense mechanism, defense reaction, defense - (psychiatry) an unconscious process that tries to reduce the anxiety associated with instinctive desires
3.repression - the act of repressing; control by holding down; "his goal was the repression of insolence"
control - the activity of managing or exerting control over something; "the control of the mob by the police was admirable"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

repression

noun
1. subjugation, control, constraint, domination, censorship, tyranny, coercion, authoritarianism, despotism a society conditioned by violence and repression
2. suppression, crushing, prohibition, quashing, dissolution extremely violent repression of opposition
3. inhibition, control, holding in, restraint, suppression, bottling up the repression of intense feelings
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

repression

noun
Sudden punitive action:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
كَبْت، قَمْع
potlačení
undertrykkelse
bæling
represia
bastırma

repression

[rɪˈpreʃən] N (gen, Psych) → represión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

repression

[rɪˈprɛʃən] n
[people, freedoms] → répression f
[feelings, desire, anger] → refoulement m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

repression

nUnterdrückung f; (Psych) → Verdrängung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

repression

[rɪˈprɛʃn] nrepressione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

repress

(rəˈpres) verb
to keep (an impulse, a desire to do something etc) under control. He repressed a desire to hit the man.
reˈpression (-ʃən) noun
reˈpressive (-siv) adjective
severe; harsh.
reˈpressiveness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

re·pres·sion

n. represión.
1. inhibición de una acción;
2. mecanismo de defensa por el que se eliminan del campo de la conciencia deseos e impulsos en conflicto.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

repression

n (psych) represión f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
A dignified gravity and repression were maintained at all times.
There was even then in the new circumstance of a people just liberated from every variety of intellectual repression and political oppression, a group of dramatic authors, whose plays were not only delightful to see but delightful to read, working in the good tradition of one of the greatest realists who has ever lived, and producing a drama of vital strength and charm.
Hers was not a rare temperament, except in its fierce resentment of repression; a feeling which like genius or lunacy is apt to drive people into sudden irrelevancy.
Everything that was interesting in Rebecca, and every evidence of power, capability, or talent afterwards displayed by her, Miranda ascribed to the brick house training, and this gave her a feeling of honest pride, the pride of a master workman who has built success out of the most unpromising material; but never, to the very end, even when the waning of her bodily strength relaxed her iron grip and weakened her power of repression, never once did she show that pride or make a single demonstration of affection.
His voice, shaking with nervous repression, was still almost hysterical.
At home I should undoubtedly have given vent to my anguish; but this new and elemental environment seemed to call for a savage repression. Like the savage, the attitude of these men was stoical in great things, childish in little things.
She sobbed softly, with considered repression, but the weak-latched door swung noiselessly open, and she was startled by her sister-in-law's voice.
He was white to the lips, his whole frame was shaking with the effort of intense repression. He kept silence, till only a flutter of her cloak was to be seen in the doorway.
Are there, infinitely varying with each individual, inbred forces of Good and Evil in all of us, deep down below the reach of mortal encouragement and mortal repression -- hidden Good and hidden Evil, both alike at the mercy of the liberating opportunity and the sufficient temptation?
Here, perhaps, we should appeal to those young men who suffer from the repression of their first desires at the moment when all their forces are developing; to artists sick of their own genius smothering under the pressure of poverty; to men of talent, persecuted and without influence, often without friends at the start, who have ended by triumphing over that double anguish, equally agonizing, of soul and body.
On the contrary, we shall suppose that, although Freudian "repression" undoubtedly occurs and is important, it is not the usual reason for unconsciousness of our wishes.
Spenser, a zealous Protestant as well as a fine-spirited idealist, was in entire sympathy with Lord Grey's policy of stern repression of the Catholic Irish, to whom, therefore, he must have appeared merely as one of the hated crew of their pitiless tyrants.