Reserve Components

Related to Reserve Components: Standby Reserve

Reserve Components

Reserve Components of the Armed Forces of the United States are: a. the Army National Guard of the United States; b. the Army Reserve; c. the Naval Reserve; d. the Marine Corps Reserve; e. the Air National Guard of the United States; f. the Air Force Reserve; and g. the Coast Guard Reserve. Also called RC. See also component; reserve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Commanding officers need to ensure Reserve components understand they are part of the fight."
(1) While the term mobilization may seem to apply only to the reserve components, a large-scale mobilization will impact the entire Joint Force due to the anticipated competition for resources including personnel, training areas, equipment, transportation, and supporting organizations.
Today we have no reserve components to protect the Philippines from internal and external threats.
Department of Defense, Unit Cost and Readiness for the Active and Reserve Components of the Armed Forces (Washington, DC: Department of Defense), 31.
(1) This case explored the limits of applying Article 2(c) of the Uniformed Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) to the reserve components. (2) At issue in Morita was whether UCMJ jurisdiction could be applied to an Air Force lieutenant colonel who signed the majority of his fraudulent travel vouchers and requests for orders while not subject to active duty or inactive duty training (IDT) orders.
The air reserve components are uniquely positioned to answer that call on an as-needed basis with combat-ready, cost-effective Airmen who do not require year-round, full-time pay and benefits.
But there are no guarantees that the work of the commission will help end the bitter budget war between the Air Force and its reserve components.
One of the root causes of this trouble is the relationship between the Air Force's active and reserve components, alignment of forces, and the budget to fund them.
For these manpower efforts, we are leveraging the relative strengths of the active and reserve components of the Total Force, with much of the recruiting, and initial and advanced formalized technical training, occurring in the active component, and significant operational--seasoning and experiencing occurring in the reserve component.
To obtain a true cost picture of the Reserve Components as an integrated operational force, one must capture both the traditional strategic costs of dwell years as well as the costs of operational deployments at some rotation frequency.

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