residential school

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residential school

n
(Education) (in Canada) a boarding school maintained by the Canadian government for Indian and Inuit children from sparsely populated settlements
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Part of understanding the history of residential schools is what happened afterwards.
Mary's Mission Indian Residential School, Mission, and Presbyterian Coqualeetza Indian Residential School, Chilliwack, first residential schools in B.
15 (Xinhua) -- Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday that the country and the government will accept full responsibility for the abuse of aboriginal children in residential schools.
Its work established, in 2005, a $2 billion reparation fund for First Nations people who had been forced to attend residential schools.
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission only recently released their final report calling for Canada-wide education on Indian residential schools, but two Canadian territories have been at it for a few years.
Ottawa--Acknowledging that their apologies for harms done at Indian residential schools "are not enough," Anglican, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic and United church leaders on June 2 welcomed the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), which they say will offer direction to their "continuing commitment to reconciliation" with Indigenous peoples.
On June 22, Notley became the first premier to formally apologize to those who attended residential schools.
OTTAWA, ONTARIO -- Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which used the term "cultural genocide" to describe what happened to aboriginal Canadians in residential schools, called for changes at all levels of society and government.
Residential Schools, With the Words and Images of Survivors: A National History
Non-Fiction / Aboriginal / Residential Schools / Canadian History
In what Truth and Reconciliation Commission Chair Justice Murray Sinclair referred to as "one of the most significant presentations we have ever had," Mirasty, accompanied by her mother, mother-in-law, and aunties, the older women all residential school survivors, likened the impact of Indian residential schools on those who never attended to the danger of second hand smoke.
The abuses were perpetrated at church-run residential schools which removed indigenous Canadians from their families, aiming to assimilate aboriginals and eradicate their separate culture.

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