bronchiole

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Related to Respiratory bronchioles: Alveolar ducts

bron·chi·ole

 (brŏng′kē-ōl′)
n.
Any of the fine, thin-walled, tubular extensions of a bronchus.

[French, from New Latin bronchiola, diminutive of Latin bronchus; see bronchus.]

bron′chi·o′lar (-ō′lər) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bronchiole

(ˈbrɒŋkɪˌəʊl)
n
(Anatomy) any of the smallest bronchial tubes, usually ending in alveoli
[C19: from New Latin bronchiolum, diminutive of Late Latin bronchium, singular of bronchia]
bronchiolar adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bron•chi•ole

(ˈbrɒŋ kiˌoʊl)

n.
a small branch of a bronchus.
[1865–70; < New Latin bronchiolum=bronchi(a) (see bronchial) + -olum -ole1]
bron`chi•o′lar, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bron·chi·ole

(brŏng′kē-ōl′)
Any of the small, thin-walled tubes that branch from a bronchus and end in the alveolar sacs of the lung.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bronchiole

A tiny subdivision of a bronchus, ending in the little air sacs called alveoli.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bronchiole - any of the smallest bronchial ducts; ending in alveoli
duct, epithelial duct, canal, channel - a bodily passage or tube lined with epithelial cells and conveying a secretion or other substance; "the tear duct was obstructed"; "the alimentary canal"; "poison is released through a channel in the snake's fangs"
lower respiratory tract - the bronchi and lungs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

bron·chi·ole

n. bronquiolo, una de las ramas menores del árbol bronquial.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bronchiole

n bronquiolo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anomaly or loss of this surfactant is ended up with micro atelectasis in alveoli and respiratory bronchioles (Holm et al.
PLCH mainly involved the distal respiratory bronchioles. The lung function of most early-stage PLCH patients was normal or only showed dysfunction of alveolar dispersion.
Cigarette smoking produces inflammatory changes in small airways, especially in respiratory bronchioles. This leads to dilatation and destruction of small airways, characterised as emphysema.
The plausible explanation for the increased prevalence of restrictive lung impairment in exposed group is mainly due to flour dust that reacts with lymphoid and connective tissue in the terminal and respiratory bronchioles and interstitial inflammatory cells.
Talaat and Xi [15] numerically investigated aerosol deposition in a single terminal alveolus with rhythmical oscillations and found significantly different particle dynamics in comparison to that in alveolated ducts or respiratory bronchioles [12,21, 32,33].
Microaspiration can cause lesions localized to membranous and particularly respiratory bronchioles and can mimic CHP with a purely peribronchiolar pattern.
Due to improved breathing pattern, respiratory bronchioles may be widened, and perfusion of a large number of alveoli can be carried out efficiently.
The airway bifurcates repeatedly, and the airways from the 1st to the 4th generations are called bronchi, those from the 5th to the 16th generations are bronchioles, those from the 17th to the 19th are respiratory bronchioles, and those from the 20th to the 23rd generations are alveolar ducts and sacs.
Intriguingly, these vessels reside in proximity to the respiratory bronchioles, where the conducting zone, or anatomic dead space, transitions into the gas exchange region.
Although there are no recommendations regarding the utility of the percent predicted forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity ([FEF.sub.25-75%]) by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) [28], some studies shows that silica dust exposure can cause widespread fibrotic lesions in small airways, affecting mostly the walls of membranous and respiratory bronchioles and to a lesser degree alveolar ducts [29].
Low ERV in obesity suggests occurrence of tidal breathing close to RV in distal high resistance airways, such as noncartilaginous small membranous terminal and respiratory bronchioles and alveolar duct, in obese populations (Figure 2).
The proposed pathogenesis of Swyer-James Macleod sydrome is bronchiolitis obliterans caused by respiratory infections in early childhood leading to inflammation, fibrosis and obstruction of the terminal and respiratory bronchioles, possibly preventing normal development of the alveolar bud (Figure 4).