restraint

(redirected from Restraints)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

re·straint

 (rĭ-strānt′)
n.
1.
a. The act of restraining: police restraint of the suspect.
b. The condition of being restrained, especially the condition of losing one's freedom: a suspect held in restraint.
2.
a. An influence that inhibits or restrains: "If the enemy could be defined as radically evil, then the restraints of morality did not apply" (James Carroll).
b. A device or other means of restraining movement: a child restraint in a car.
3. Control of the expression of one's feelings; constraint: cursed without restraint.

[Middle English restreinte, from Old French restrainte, from feminine past participle of restraindre, to restrain; see restrain.]

restraint

(rɪˈstreɪnt)
n
1. the ability to control or moderate one's impulses, passions, etc: to show restraint.
2. the act of restraining or the state of being restrained
3. something that restrains; restriction
[C15: from Old French restreinte, from restreindre to restrain]

re•straint

(rɪˈstreɪnt)

n.
1. a restraining action or influence.
2. a means of restraining.
3. a device that restrains, as a harness.
4. the act of restraining.
5. the state or fact of being restrained; confinement.
6. constraint or reserve, as in behavior.
[1350–1400; Middle English restreinte < Middle French restrainte, n. use of feminine past participle of restraindre to restrain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.restraint - the act of controlling by restraining someone or something; "the unlawful restraint of trade"
control - the activity of managing or exerting control over something; "the control of the mob by the police was admirable"
leash, collar - a figurative restraint; "asked for a collar on program trading in the stock market"; "kept a tight leash on his emotions"; "he's always gotten a long leash"
damper - a depressing restraint; "rain put a damper on our picnic plans"
bridle, curb, check - the act of restraining power or action or limiting excess; "his common sense is a bridle to his quick temper"
immobilizing, immobilisation, immobilization - the act of limiting movement or making incapable of movement; "the storm caused complete immobilization of the rescue team"
confinement - the act of restraining of a person's liberty by confining them
containment - the act of containing; keeping something from spreading; "the containment of the AIDS epidemic"; "the containment of the rebellion"
curtailment, suppression - the act of withholding or withdrawing some book or writing from publication or circulation; "a suppression of the newspaper"
restraint of trade - any act that tends to prevent free competition in business
restriction, confinement - the act of keeping something within specified bounds (by force if necessary); "the restriction of the infection to a focal area"
2.restraint - discipline in personal and social activities; "he was a model of polite restraint"; "she never lost control of herself"
discipline - the trait of being well behaved; "he insisted on discipline among the troops"
self-restraint, temperateness - exhibiting restraint imposed on the self; "an effective temperateness in debate"
temperance, moderation - the trait of avoiding excesses
inhibition - the quality of being inhibited
continence - voluntary control over urinary and fecal discharge
unrestraint - the quality of lacking restraint
3.restraint - the state of being physically constrainedrestraint - the state of being physically constrained; "dogs should be kept under restraint"
confinement - the state of being confined; "he was held in confinement"
cage - something that restricts freedom as a cage restricts movement
4.restraint - a rule or condition that limits freedom; "legal restraints"; "restraints imposed on imports"
limitation, restriction - a principle that limits the extent of something; "I am willing to accept certain restrictions on my movements"
floodgate - something that restrains a flood or outpouring; "suspension of surveillance opened the floodgates to illegal immigrants"
5.restraint - lack of ornamentation; "the room was simply decorated with great restraint"
plainness - the appearance of being plain and unpretentious
6.restraint - a device that retards something's motion; "the car did not have proper restraints fitted"
air bag - a safety restraint in an automobile; the bag inflates on collision and prevents the driver or passenger from being thrown forward
airbrake, dive brake - a small parachute or articulated flap to reduce the speed of an aircraft
arrester, arrester hook - a restraint that slows airplanes as they land on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier
band - a restraint put around something to hold it together
brake - a restraint used to slow or stop a vehicle
brake - anything that slows or hinders a process; "she wan not ready to put the brakes on her life with a marriage"; "new legislation will put the brakes on spending"
brake pad - one of the pads that apply friction to both sides of the brake disk
brake shoe, skid, shoe - a restraint provided when the brake linings are moved hydraulically against the brake drum to retard the wheel's rotation
catch, stop - a restraint that checks the motion of something; "he used a book as a stop to hold the door open"
chain - anything that acts as a restraint
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
fastening, holdfast, fastener, fixing - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in place
gag, muzzle - restraint put into a person's mouth to prevent speaking or shouting
leash, tether, lead - restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animal
ignition lock, lock - a restraint incorporated into the ignition switch to prevent the use of a vehicle by persons who do not have the key
muzzle - a leather or wire restraint that fits over an animal's snout (especially a dog's nose and jaws) and prevents it from eating or biting
life belt, safety belt, safety harness - belt attaching you to some object as a restraint in order to prevent you from getting hurt
sea anchor, drogue - restraint consisting of a canvas covered frame that floats behind a vessel; prevents drifting or maintains the heading into a wind
hamper, shackle, trammel, bond - a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner)
trammel - a restraint that is used to teach a horse to amble

restraint

noun
1. limitation, limit, check, ban, boycott, embargo, curb, rein, taboo, bridle, disqualification, interdict Criminals could cross into the country without restraint.
limitation freedom, liberty
2. self-control, self-discipline, self-restraint, self-possession, pulling your punches They behaved with more restraint than I'd expected.
self-control licence, excess, self-indulgence, intemperance, immoderation
3. constraint, limitation, inhibition, moderation, hold, control, restriction, prevention, suppression, hindrance, curtailment A Bill of Rights would act as a restraint on judicial power.
4. confinement, arrest, detention, imprisonment, captivity, bondage, fetters There was a meeting and he was put under restraint.
5. belt, strap, harness, seat belt, safety belt Children are always safer in a restraint or belt.

restraint

noun
1. The act of limiting or condition of being limited:
3. An instrument or means of restraining:
4. Something that physically confines the legs or arms:
bond, chain (used in plural), fetter, handcuff (often used in plural), hobble, iron (used in plural), manacle, shackle.
Archaic: gyve.
5. The keeping of one's thoughts and emotions to oneself:
Translations
itsehillintämalttipidättyväisyysside
brzdanje

restraint

[rɪsˈtreɪnt] N
1. (= check) → restricción f; (= control) → control m; (= check on wages) → moderación f
a restraint on tradeuna restricción sobre el comercio
a restraint on free enterpriseuna limitación de la libre empresa
to be under a restraintestar cohibido
to fret under a restraintimpacientarse por una restricción
to put sb under a restraintrefrenar a algn (Jur) → imponer una restricción legal a algn
without restraintsin restricción
2. (= constraint) [of manner] → reserva f; [of character] → moderación f, comedimiento m
3. (= self-control) → autodominio m, control m de sí mismo
he showed great restraintmostró poseer un gran autodominio

restraint

[rɪˈstreɪnt] n
(= restriction) → contrainte f
without restraint → sans retenue
(= control) → contrôle m
price restraint → contrôle des prix
wage restraint → contrôle des salaires
(= self-control) → retenue f
[style] → sobriété f
(= safety device) → dispositif m de retenue child restraint

restraint

n
(= restriction)Einschränkung f, → Beschränkung f; without restraintunbeschränkt; developungehemmt; to put/keep somebody under restraint (Jur) → jdn in Haft nehmen/behalten
(= moderation)Beherrschung f; to show a lack of restraintwenig Beherrschung zeigen; he said with great restraint that …er sagte sehr beherrscht, dass …; to express oneself without restraintsich zwangslos ausdrücken; wage restraintZurückhaltung fbei Lohnforderungen
(= head restraint)Kopfstütze f

restraint

[rɪˈstreɪnt] n
a. (check, control) → limitazioni fpl, restrizioni fpl
wage restraint → contenimento salariale
b. (constraint, moderation, YYY, of manner) → ritegno, riservatezza; (self-control) → autocontrollo
without restraint → senza reticenze, liberamente

re·straint

n. restricción; confinamiento;
___ in bed___ en cama;
mechanical ______ mecánica;
medicinal ______ con uso de medicamentos.

restraint

n (of a patient) contención f, sujeción f; chemical — contención or sujeción química; mechanical — contención or sujeción mecánica; physical restraints correas, ataduras, cintas para limitar los movimientos de un paciente agitado
References in classic literature ?
What I did next I scarcely know, for I had never before found myself in such a position; but I believe that I broke all restraints, and made the old man feel thoroughly ashamed of himself--Thedora helping me in the task, and well-nigh turning him neck and crop out of the tenement.
There are causes of differences within our immediate contemplation, of the tendency of which, even under the restraints of a federal constitution, we have had sufficient experience to enable us to form a judgment of what might be expected if those restraints were removed.
Under this head might be included the particular restraints imposed on the authority of the States, and certain powers of the judicial department; but the former are reserved for a distinct class, and the latter will be particularly examined when we arrive at the structure and organization of the government.
Ellmother burst out--and then, when it was too late, remembered the conventional restraints appropriate to the occasion.
And after such classification he avoided the things that hurt, the restrictions and restraints, in order to enjoy the satisfactions and the remunerations of life.
But, after all, it may be good for ships to go through a period of restraint and repose, as the restraint and self- communion of inactivity may be good for an unruly soul - not, indeed, that I mean to say that ships are unruly; on the contrary, they are faithful creatures, as so many men can testify.
Malone desires to state that both the injunction for restraint and the libel action have been withdrawn unreservedly by Professor G.
As for the negro--well, I can only say that it was solely due to the self- restraint which you impressed on me that I did not wipe him out as he stood--without warning, without fair play--without a single one of the graces of life and death.
So far there is no positive brain disease; and there is accordingly no sort of reason for placing him under restraint.
Circumstances of an imperious nature, which it is unnecessary to relate here, had prevented him from taking service with that gallant army which had fought the disastrous campaigns ending with the fall of Corinth, and he chafed under the inglorious restraint, longing for the release of his energies, the larger life of the soldier, the opportunity for distinction.
But the most ordinary cause of a single life, is liberty, especially in certain self-pleasing and humorous minds, which are so sensible of every restraint, as they will go near to think their girdles and garters, to be bonds and shackles.
I left the old gentleman and Miss Halcombe to enter the house together, and to talk of family matters undisturbed by the restraint of a stranger's presence.