rhetoric

(redirected from Rethoric)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Rethoric: Political rhetoric

rhet·o·ric

 (rĕt′ər-ĭk)
n.
1.
a. The art or study of using language effectively and persuasively.
b. A treatise or book discussing this art.
2. Skill in using language effectively and persuasively.
3.
a. A style of speaking or writing, especially the language of a particular subject: fiery political rhetoric.
b. Language that is elaborate, pretentious, insincere, or intellectually vacuous: His offers of compromise were mere rhetoric.
4. Verbal communication; discourse.

[Middle English rethorik, from Old French rethorique, from Latin rhētoricē, rhētorica, from Greek rhētorikē (tekhnē), rhetorical (art), feminine of rhētorikos, rhetorical, from rhētōr, rhetor; see rhetor.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rhetoric

(ˈrɛtərɪk)
n
1. (Rhetoric) the study of the technique of using language effectively
2. (Rhetoric) the art of using speech to persuade, influence, or please; oratory
3. excessive use of ornamentation and contrivance in spoken or written discourse; bombast
4. speech or discourse that pretends to significance but lacks true meaning: all the politician says is mere rhetoric.
[C14: via Latin from Greek rhētorikē (tekhnē) (the art of) rhetoric, from rhētōr rhetor]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rhet•o•ric

(ˈrɛt ər ɪk)

n.
1.
a. the art of effectively using language, including the use of figures of speech.
b. language skillfully used.
c. a book or treatise on rhetoric.
2. the undue use of exaggerated language; bombast.
3. the art of prose writing.
4. the art of persuasive speaking; oratory.
[1300–50; Middle English rethorik < Medieval Latin rēthorica, Latin rhētorica < Greek rhētorikḕ (téchnē) rhetorical (art); see rhetor, -ic]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

rhetoric

  • rhetor - A teacher of rhetoric or a master of it.
  • climax - First described propositions in rhetoric, one rising above the other in effectiveness; it comes from Greek klimax, "ladder."
  • demagoguery, demagogy - Demagoguery and demagogy are the practices or rhetoric of a demagogue.
  • scheme - From Greek skhema, "figure, form," it first referred to a figure of speech, especially a figure of rhetoric, denoting a way of deviating from the ordinary use and order of words to create special effect.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhetoric - using language effectively to please or persuade
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
2.rhetoric - high-flown stylerhetoric - high-flown style; excessive use of verbal ornamentation; "the grandiosity of his prose"; "an excessive ornateness of language"
flourish - a display of ornamental speech or language
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
blah, bombast, claptrap, fustian, rant - pompous or pretentious talk or writing
3.rhetoric - loud and confused and empty talk; "mere rhetoric"
hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality, bunk - a message that seems to convey no meaning
4.rhetoric - study of the technique and rules for using language effectively (especially in public speaking)
literary study - the humanistic study of literature
exordium - (rhetoric) the introductory section of an oration or discourse
narration - (rhetoric) the second section of an oration in which the facts are set forth
peroration - (rhetoric) the concluding section of an oration; "he summarized his main points in his peroration"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
epanodos - repetition of a group of words in reverse order
epanodos - recapitulation of the main ideas of a speech (especially in reverse order)
ploce - (rhetoric) repetition to gain special emphasis or extend meaning
allocution - (rhetoric) a formal or authoritative address that advises or exhorts
anacoluthic - of or related to syntactic inconsistencies of the sort known as anacoluthons
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

rhetoric

noun
1. hyperbole, rant, hot air (informal), pomposity, bombast, wordiness, verbosity, fustian, grandiloquence, magniloquence He has continued his warlike rhetoric.
2. oratory, eloquence, public speaking, speech-making, elocution, declamation, speechifying, grandiloquence, spieling (informal) the noble institutions, such as political rhetoric
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

rhetoric

noun
The art of public speaking:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
řečnictvírétorika
puhetaitoretoriikka
govorništvoretorika

rhetoric

[ˈretərɪk] Nretórica f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

rhetoric

[ˈrɛtərɪk] nrhétorique f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rhetoric

nRhetorik f; (pej)Phrasendrescherei f (pej)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

rhetoric

[ˈrɛtərɪk] nretorica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"I do not understand you, husband," replied Teresa; "do as you like, and don't break my head with any more speechifying and rethoric; and if you have revolved to do what you say-"
Barack Obama's Proverbial Rethoric. New York: Peter Lang.
Work activation regimes and well-being of unemployed people: rethoric. risk and reality of quasi marketization in the UK programme.
Migiel's analysis clearly demonstrates how readers' experience is shaped by individual, subjective perceptions of the text that can be influenced by different factors such as the readers' ability to comprehend the Decameron's rethoric or their disposition to reflect on, and consequently abandon, preconceptions that might limit an actual comprehension of the text.
"Investors thought it was a mere election campaign rethoric of Trump, but they are seeing it in reality now.