revelation

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rev·e·la·tion

 (rĕv′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of revealing or disclosing.
b. Something revealed, especially a dramatic disclosure of something not previously known or realized.
c. A sudden insight or idea: "I'd had the idea to dig up Dad's coffin ... I was lying in bed and I had the revelation, like a simple solution to an impossible problem" (Jonathan Safran Foer).
2. Theology A manifestation of divine will or truth.
3. Revelation See Table at Bible.

[Middle English revelacion, from Old French revelation, from Latin revēlātiō, revēlātiōn-, from revēlātus, past participle of revēlāre, to reveal; see reveal1.]

revelation

(ˌrɛvəˈleɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of disclosing something previously secret or obscure, esp something true
2. a fact disclosed or revealed, esp in a dramatic or surprising way
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity
a. God's disclosure of his own nature and his purpose for mankind, esp through the words of human intermediaries
b. something in which such a divine disclosure is contained, such as the Bible
4. (Bible) Christianity
a. God's disclosure of his own nature and his purpose for mankind, esp through the words of human intermediaries
b. something in which such a divine disclosure is contained, such as the Bible
[C14: from Church Latin revēlātiō from Latin revēlāre to reveal]
ˌreveˈlational adj

Revelation

(ˌrɛvəˈleɪʃən)
n
(Bible) (popularly, often plural) Also called: the Apocalypse or the Revelation of Saint John the Divine the last book of the New Testament, containing visionary descriptions of heaven, of conflicts between good and evil, and of the end of the world

rev•e•la•tion

(ˌrɛv əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of revealing or disclosing; disclosure.
2. something revealed or disclosed, esp. a striking disclosure, as of something not before realized.
3. Theol.
a. God's disclosure of Himself and His will to His creatures.
b. an instance of such communication or disclosure.
c. something thus communicated or disclosed.
d. something that contains such disclosure, as the Bible.
4. (cap.) Usu., Revelations. Also called The Revelation of St. John the Divine. the last book in the New Testament; the Apocalypse.
[1275–1325; Middle English revelacion (< Old French) < Late Latin revēlātiō= Latin revēlā(re) to reveal1 + -tiō -tion]
rev`e•la′tion•al, adj.
rev′e•la`tor, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revelation - the speech act of making something evidentrevelation - the speech act of making something evident
tattle, singing, telling - disclosing information or giving evidence about another
speech act - the use of language to perform some act
display - behavior that makes your feelings public; "a display of emotion"
divulgement, divulgence - the act of disclosing something that was secret or private
discovery - something that is discovered
discovery - (law) compulsory pretrial disclosure of documents relevant to a case; enables one side in a litigation to elicit information from the other side concerning the facts in the case
giveaway - an unintentional disclosure
informing, ratting - to furnish incriminating evidence to an officer of the law (usually in return for favors)
news leak, leak - unauthorized (especially deliberate) disclosure of confidential information
exposure - the disclosure of something secret; "they feared exposure of their campaign plans"
2.revelation - an enlightening or astonishing disclosure
brainstorm, brainwave, insight - the clear (and often sudden) understanding of a complex situation
3.revelation - communication of knowledge to man by a divine or supernatural agency
making known, informing - a speech act that conveys information
4.revelation - the last book of the New TestamentRevelation - the last book of the New Testament; contains visionary descriptions of heaven and of conflicts between good and evil and of the end of the world; attributed to Saint John the Apostle
Four Horsemen - (New Testament) the four evils that will come at the end of the world: conquest rides a white horse; war a red horse; famine a black horse; plague a pale horse
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible

revelation

revelation

noun
Something disclosed, especially something not previously known or realized:
Informal: eye opener.
Translations
كَشْفٌ مُثير للدَّهْشَهوَحْي، كَشْف
odhalenízjeveníobjev
afsløring
Jelenések könyve
afhjúpunafhjúpun, opinberun
atklājumsatklāšana
revelatie
açıklamaaçıklanan şey

revelation

[ˌrevəˈleɪʃən] Nrevelación f
(Book of) Revelationsel Apocalipsis
it was a revelation to mefue una revelación para mí

revelation

[ˌrɛvəˈleɪʃən] n
(= surprising fact) → révélation f
revelations about his private life → des révélations sur sa vie privée
(= eye-opener) → révélation f
Dali's show was a revelation → L'exposition Dali fut une révélation.
to be a revelation to sb → être une révélation pour qn
(= revealing) [affair, fact, secret] → révélation f
(RELIGION)révélation f

revelation

nEnthüllung f; (Rel) → Offenbarung f; (the book of) Revelationsdie Offenbarung (des Johannes); it was a revelation to medas hat mir die Augen geöffnet; what a revelation!unglaublich!

revelation

[ˌrɛvəˈleɪʃn] nrivelazione f
(the Book of the) Revelation (Bible) → l'Apocalisse f

revelation

(revəˈleiʃən) noun
1. the act of revealing secrets, information etc. the revelation of the true facts.
2. something made known. amazing revelations.
References in classic literature ?
I revered our theology, and aspired as much as any one to reach heaven: but being given assuredly to understand that the way is not less open to the most ignorant than to the most learned, and that the revealed truths which lead to heaven are above our comprehension, I did not presume to subject them to the impotency of my reason; and I thought that in order competently to undertake their examination, there was need of some special help from heaven, and of being more than man.
88 by no longer saying that the response of faith is also to be given to truths proposed in a definitive way that are necessarily connected to revealed truth.
The mark of a "good" Catholic is not only fidelity to the revealed truth of the Gospel, but the associated virtue of humility.
Through his labors, Paul Brand, a missionary physician who served leprosy patients (mostly in India and North America), effectively turned the conundrum of evil into a reasonable affirmation of revealed truth.
St Thomas Aquinas is best remembered for his Summa Theologicae and his Sununu Contra Gentiles but as the editors remind us, these two are only the biggest and highest peaks in a range of works that reflect the wealth of thirteenth century theological and philosophical investigation, especially into the relations between revealed truth and natural theology.
But in their clashing nature/culture palette, and with their strange, patient gaze, these shots also potentially call to mind the gray-green vistas of Tarkovsky's "zone"--a correspondence that hints, perhaps, at deepening mystery, rather than revealed truth, in the engagement with such resonant historical spaces.
Modern historians, writers and statesmen should liberate themselves from the biblical myths when reviewing history even if they believe in a revealed truth in their private lives.
For example, Father Richard Malloy refers to evolution as a single theory, but Pope John Paul II, in his 1986 address to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, reminds us that there are several theories of evolution, and those that reduce humanity to mere matter are incompatible with revealed truth.
I may disagree, but if you sincerely believe God's revealed truth objects to it then it is perfectly honorable to oppose it.
One recently revealed truth has proven devastating to safe owners .
It is not itself a revealed truth, but the solution (11) to the word problem we get into when we accept revelation in Jesus, the continuance of that revelation in the Holy Spirit, and hold to monotheism at the same time.
I don't think that encountering someone in a church pulpit who has no belief in revealed truth and who by various ways and means will tell you during the course of a sermon that we don't really believe in God any more but coming to church is a swell cultural pastime is a real turn-on for many people.