revenue

(redirected from Revenues)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Revenues: Unearned Revenues, Deferred Revenues

rev·e·nue

 (rĕv′ə-no͞o, -nyo͞o)
n.
1. The income of a government from all sources appropriated for the payment of the public expenses.
2. Yield from property or investment; income.
3. All the income produced by a particular source.
4. A governmental department set up to collect public funds.

[Middle English, from Old French, from feminine past participle of revenir, to return, from Latin revenīre : re-, re- + venīre, to come; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

revenue

(ˈrɛvɪˌnjuː)
n
1. (Economics) the income accruing from taxation to a government during a specified period of time, usually a year
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. a government department responsible for the collection of government revenue
b. (as modifier): revenue men.
3. (Banking & Finance) the gross income from a business enterprise, investment, property, etc
4. (Banking & Finance) a particular item of income
5. (Banking & Finance) something that yields a regular financial return; source of income
[C16: from Old French, from revenir to return, from Latin revenīre; see revenant]
ˈreveˌnued adj

rev•e•nue

(ˈrɛv ənˌyu, -əˌnu)

n.
1. the income of a government from taxation and other sources, appropriated for public expenses.
2. the government department charged with the collection of such income.
3. revenues, the collective items or amounts of income of a person, a state, etc.
4. the return or yield from any kind of property, patent, service, etc.; income.
5. an amount of money regularly coming in.
6. a particular item or source of income.
[1375–1425; < Middle French, n. use of feminine past participle of revenir to return < Latin revenīre=re- re- + venīre to come]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revenue - the entire amount of income before any deductions are maderevenue - the entire amount of income before any deductions are made
box office - total admission receipts for an entertainment
gate - total admission receipts at a sports event
amount, amount of money, sum, sum of money - a quantity of money; "he borrowed a large sum"; "the amount he had in cash was insufficient"
2.revenue - government income due to taxationrevenue - government income due to taxation  
government income, government revenue - income available to the government
internal revenue - government revenue from domestic sources (excluding customs)

revenue

noun income, interest, returns, profits, gain, rewards, yield, proceeds, receipts, takings They wanted a big share of the revenue from the mine.
expenses, expenditure, outgoings
Translations
إِيْرادإيراد، دَخْل، رَيْع
příjemtržbavýnosdůchod
indtægt
liikevaihtotulotverotulot
prihod
állami jövedelem
tekjur; ríkistekjur
収入
세입
įplaukos
ienākumiienākums
intäkter
รายได้
doanh thu

revenue

[ˈrevənjuː]
A. N (= profit, income) → ingresos mpl, rentas fpl; (on investments) → rédito m; [of country] → rentas fpl públicas
see also inland
B. CPD revenue account Ncuenta f de ingresos presupuestarios
revenue expenditure Ngasto m corriente
revenue stamp Ntimbre m fiscal

revenue

[ˈrɛvənjuː] nrevenu mrevenue stream nsource f de revenus

revenue

n (of state)Staatseinkünfte pl, → öffentliche Einnahmen pl; (= tax revenue)Steueraufkommen nt; (of individual)Einnahmen pl, → Einkünfte pl; (= department)Finanzbehörde f, → Fiskus m ? Inland Revenue, internal

revenue

:
revenue investigator
nSteuerfahnder(in) m(f)
revenue officer
nFinanzbeamte(r) m/-beamtin f
revenue stamp
n (US) → Steuermarke f, → Steuerbanderole f

revenue

[ˈrɛvənjuː] nentrate fpl, reddito

revenue

(ˈrevinjuː) noun
money which comes to a person etc from any source or sources (eg property, shares), especially the money which comes to a government from taxes etc.

revenue

إِيْراد příjem indtægt Staatseinnahmen έσοδο ingresos verotulot revenu prihod reddito 収入 세입 inkomen omsetning dochód pieniężny receita доход intäkter รายได้ vergi geliri doanh thu 收入
References in classic literature ?
And yet, from the want of the fostering influence of commerce, that monarch can boast but slender revenues.
The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue From the New York Packet.
Every reader must recollect, that after the fall of the Catholic Church, and the Presbyterian Church Government had been established by law, the rank, and especially the wealth, of the Bishops, Abbots, Priors, and so forth, were no longer vested in ecclesiastics, but in lay impropriators of the church revenues, or, as the Scottish lawyers called them, titulars of the temporalities of the benefice, though having no claim to the spiritual character of their predecessors in office.
Of these laymen, who were thus invested with ecclesiastical revenues, some were men of high birth and rank, like the famous Lord James Stewart, the Prior of St Andrews, who did not fail to keep for their own use the rents, lands, and revenues of the church.
Malicorne had taken to make his revenues fructify, twelve thousand livres might rise to twenty thousand.
de Manicamp, with his tact and talent, had created himself a revenue in the opulent family of the celebrated marechal.
His revenues were rather less than 400 pounds yearly, and they were expended on the maintenance of one elephant and a standing army of five men.
As a result, these revenues were already quadrupled, and yet the burden was so much more equably distributed than before, that all the king- dom felt a sense of relief, and the praises of my ad- ministration were hearty and general.
Many, they say, abandoned all the pleasures and vanities of life for solitude and religious austerities; others devoted themselves to God in an ecclesiastical life; they who could not do these set apart their revenues for building churches, endowing chapels, and founding monasteries, and spent their wealth in costly ornaments for the churches and vessels for the altars.
Livesey's; the rest were revenue officers, whom he had met by the way, and with whom he had had the intelligence to return at once.
Next to the effectual establishment of the Union, the best possible precaution against danger from standing armies is a limitation of the term for which revenue may be appropriated to their support.
With this loss of substance and exhaustion of strength, the homes of the people will be stripped bare, and three-tenths of their income will be dissipated; while government expenses for broken chariots, worn-out horses, breast-plates and helmets, bows and arrows, spears and shields, protective mantles, draught-oxen and heavy wagons, will amount to four-tenths of its total revenue.