reverse transcriptase inhibitor

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reverse transcriptase inhibitor

n. Abbr. RTI
Any of various antiviral compounds that interfere with the activity of the enzyme reverse transcriptase, which is found especially in retroviruses such as HIV. These compounds are divided into two classes: those that are nucleoside analogs (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors) and those that are not nucleoside analogs (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reverse transcriptase inhibitor - an antiviral drug that inhibits the action of reverse transcriptase in retroviruses such as HIV
antiviral, antiviral agent, antiviral drug - any drug that destroys viruses
NNRTI, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor - an antiviral drug used against HIV; binds directly to reverse transcriptase and prevents RNA conversion to DNA; often used in combination with other drugs
NRTI, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor - an antiviral drug used against HIV; is incorporated into the DNA of the virus and stops the building process; results in incomplete DNA that cannot create a new virus; often used in combination with other drugs
References in periodicals archive ?
saquinavir (Fortovase) plus 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs),
Nevirapine was granted accelerated approval for use in combination with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) by the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in June 1996.
Patients at study entry were infected with HIV that was resistant to one or more drugs in each of the three oral anti-retroviral drug classes (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs), and protease inhibitors (PI)), were receiving ART for more than three months and had HIV viral loads greater than 5,000 copies/mL and CD4 counts greater than 50 cells/mm3.
The US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approved it in its first formulation (saquinavir hard-gel, saquinavir mesylate or Invirase) for use in combination with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in December 1995.
In this study, PA-457's anti-HIV activity was tested against a number of commonly occurring HIV strains resistant to approved drugs including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-NRTIs, protease inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors.
Previously, she held product marketing positions at Bristol-Myers-Squibb in virology, where she was in charge of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) Zerit(R) and Videx(R) for treatment of HIV, and at Bayer Pharma, where she was involved with the launch of Glucor(R) for treatment of diabetes.
The study compared 271 subjects experienced with 2 or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and 1 protease inhibitor, with viral loads greater than 2000 copies/mL.
Amex:ANX) today announced data from an in vitro study indicating that Thiovir(TM), the Company's non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), demonstrated effectiveness against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), which is resistant to other NNRTIs and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs).
Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors plus Non-nucleoside
Rifampicin, a key component of TB treatment, is a potent inducer of drug metabolism and decreases plasma concentrations of many co-administered drugs, including non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors.
Use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients The SMART/INSIGHT and DAD Study Groups AIDS, 2008, 22, F17-F24
The group conducted a study, published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine, that investigated the association of cumulative exposure to protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with the risk of myocardial infarction.

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