reverse transcriptase inhibitor

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reverse transcriptase inhibitor

n. Abbr. RTI
Any of various antiviral compounds that interfere with the activity of the enzyme reverse transcriptase, which is found especially in retroviruses such as HIV. These compounds are divided into two classes: those that are nucleoside analogs (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors) and those that are not nucleoside analogs (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reverse transcriptase inhibitor - an antiviral drug that inhibits the action of reverse transcriptase in retroviruses such as HIV
antiviral, antiviral agent, antiviral drug - any drug that destroys viruses
NNRTI, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor - an antiviral drug used against HIV; binds directly to reverse transcriptase and prevents RNA conversion to DNA; often used in combination with other drugs
NRTI, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor - an antiviral drug used against HIV; is incorporated into the DNA of the virus and stops the building process; results in incomplete DNA that cannot create a new virus; often used in combination with other drugs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The phase III ATLAS study met its primary endpoint, with cabotegravir and rilpivirine demonstrating non-inferiority to an oral three-drug regimen of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors plus a third agent, as measured by the proportion of participants with plasma HIV-1 RNA greater than or equal to50 copies per millilitre using the FDA Snapshot algorithm at Week 48.
The team tested six different HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors to see if they could block L1 activity and the interferon response.
It was reported on Friday that the trials, named GEMINI-1 and GEMINI-2, evaluated the 2DR against a three-drug regimen of dolutegravir and two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV-1 patients with baseline viral loads under 500,000 copies per ml.
Here, we conducted a nonlinear QSAR study of reverse transcriptase inhibitors based on a set of molecules derived from 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) (Fig 1).
The pooled, open-label study reported on 1,028 individuals who met a base criteria of stable viral suppression (viral load fewer than 50 copies/mL) by a first or second CAR regimen consisting of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NR-TIs) plus a third drug (nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, integrase strand transfer inhibitors, or a protease inhibitor) for a minimum of 6 months at time of screening.
There are six main types of antiretroviral drugs that currently exist based on the stage in the viral life cycle where they are targeted: (i) nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), that work by blocking the reverse transcriptase enzyme so that HIV cannot make new virus copies of itself; (ii) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), which work by blocking the enzyme reverse transcriptase and prevent reverse transcription, thus stopping HIV replication; (iii) protease inhibitors (PIs), that work by blocking the activity of protease enzymes.
Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) have been used for decades to treat infection with retroviruses, such as HIV, by blocking a key enzyme which they need to make more copies of themselves.
There are no clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions between nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and rifampicin-based TB treatment.
One is called reverse transcriptase inhibitors (AZT is the best known) and the other protease inhibitors.
Both are non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, which block HIV viral replication.
Among their topics are the role of radioactive iodine in managing differentiated thyroid carcinoma, a pilot study with review of actual literature on the value of tumor M2-PK in thyroid carcinoma, familial non-medullary thyroid carcinoma, recent advances in treating medullary thyroid carcinoma, and the role of reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a novel molecular-targeted treatment in managing poorly differentiated thyroid tumors.

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