Revocability


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Related to Revocability: scrutinisation

Rev`o`ca`bil´i`ty


n.1.The quality of being revocable; as, the revocability of a law.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
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The argument of revocability is as absurd as a suggestion that if the Indian Independence Act was revoked by the British Parliament, we will lose our Independence," added Jaitely.
(45) Under the ancient ouster and revocability doctrines, courts refused to grant specific performance of an arbitration provision.
The Commons Library team write: "The debate about revocability has not been resolved.
2) Revocability: It should be possible to revoke a compromised template and replace it with a new one based on the same biometric data.
That before his death, the transfer should be revocable by the transferor at will, ad nutum; but revocability may be provided for indirectly by means of a reserved power in the donor to dispose of the properties conveyed;
It is of no surprise- that France's Macron, Germany's Merkel, Turkey's Erdogan and Russia's Putin- all these leaders are one against Trump's revocability approach.
(47) Most famously, Lord Coke declined to order a dispute between merchants to private adjudication in 1609, explaining that while a merchant was free to contract for private dispute resolution, "he might countermand it; for a man cannot by his act make such authority, power, or warrant not countermandable which is by the law or of its own nature countermandable." (48) The original rationale for this revocability is unclear, (49) but by the eighteenth century, English courts cited judicial envy.
The first of these rules was the "rule of revocability." The second rule barred courts from granting specific performance for breach of arbitration provisions.
"To improve the bargaining position of the UK, to ensure we retain the opt-outs and rebates that we presently enjoy, and to place the decision entirely in the hands of the UK's Parliament and -- if it chooses -- its people, we must seek to establish a legal route to revocability," he wrote in an explanatory blog.
According to the international standard ISO/IEC 24745 [1], biometric template protection should satisfy the irreversibility, revocability, and unlinkability.
A good template protection scheme should meet the following criteria: diversity, revocability, security and performance [3].