Reye's syndrome

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Related to Reye Syndrome: aspirin, black mass

Reye's syndrome

 (rīz, rāz) or Reye syndrome (rī, rā)
n.
An acute disorder characterized by encephalopathy and an accumulation of fatty deposits in the liver, resulting in vomiting, disorientation, and coma and occurring mainly in children following a viral infection such as chickenpox or influenza. It is linked to the use of aspirin and other salicylates.

[After Ralph Douglas Kenneth Reye (1912-1978), Australian pediatrician.]

Reye's syndrome

(raɪz; reɪz)
n
(Pathology) a rare metabolic disease in children that can be fatal, involving damage to the brain, liver, and kidneys
[C20: named after R. D. K. Reye (1912–78) Australian paediatrician]

Reye's′ syn`drome


(rīz, rāz),
n.
a rare disorder occurring primarily in children after a viral illness and associated with aspirin usage, characterized by vomiting, swelling of the brain, and liver dysfunction.
[after Ralph Douglas Kenneth Reye (1912–78), Australian pediatrician, who cowrote a description of the syndrome in 1963]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Reye's syndrome - acquired encephalopathy following acute viral infections (especially influenza or chicken pox) in young children; characterized by fever, vomiting, disorientation, coma, and fatty infiltration of the liver
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
Translations

Reye's syndrome

n. síndrome de Reye, enfermedad aguda que se manifiesta en niños y adolescentes con edema agudo en órganos importantes esp. en el cerebro y el hígado.
References in periodicals archive ?
Children under 16 shouldn't be given aspirin, except on the advice of a doctor, because this drug is linked with Reye syndrome, which can affect the kidneys.
An example is moulds such as aflatoxins, that occur naturally in crops, often during moist conditions or storage, which may cause liver disease, cancer, and can even trigger Reye syndrome.
Over this same period physicians began advising patients to use acetaminophen rather than aspirin because of aspirin's link to Reye syndrome.
Aspirin or aspirin-containing products should not be administered to any confirmed or suspected cases of H1N1 in those aged 18 or younger due to the risk of Reye syndrome.
Clinical symptoms of the persons infected with the NII561-2000-related viruses were infectious gastroenteritis, rash, upper respiratory tract infection, and paralysis, in addition to Reye syndrome in the 1-year-old girl.
Another very serious complication, Reye syndrome, can also sometimes follow chickenpox.