Raynaud's disease

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Ray·naud's disease

 (rā-nōz′)
n.
A circulatory disorder caused by insufficient blood supply to the hands and feet and resulting in cyanosis, numbness, pain, and, in extreme cases, gangrene.

[After Maurice Raynaud, (1834-1881), French physician.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Raynaud's disease

(ˈreɪnəʊz)
n
(Pathology) a disease, mainly affecting women, in which spasms in the blood vessels of the fingers or toes restrict blood flow to the affected part, which becomes pale, numb, and sometimes painful. Often shortened to: Raynaud's
[named after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician who first described it]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ray•naud's′ disease`

(reɪˈnoʊz)
n.
a vascular disorder characterized by blanching and numbness of the fingers or toes upon exposure to cold or stress.
[1880–85; after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician, who described it]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The reported prevalence of Reynaud's Phenomenon ranges from 3 per cent to 21 per cent with women being more frequently affected than men at a ratio of approximately 4 to 1".
6 A circulatory problem called Reynaud's phenomenon due to hypersensitivity to the cold.
Other clinical manifestations included painful bilateral swollen joints, pain in different parts of the body, Reynaud's phenomenon, malaise, swollen body parts, ulcers problem, fatigue, nodules on skin and elbows, deformities of fingers/ hand, etc, similar to findings of Khan et al18.