rhizome

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rhizome
Solomon's seal rhizome

rhi·zome

 (rī′zōm′)
n.
A horizontal, usually underground stem that often sends out roots and shoots from its nodes. Also called rootstock.

[Greek rhizōma, mass of roots, from rhizoun, to cause to take root, from rhiza, root; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

rhi·zom′a·tous (-zŏm′ə-təs, -zō′mə-) adj.
rhi·zom′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rhizome

(ˈraɪzəʊm)
n
(Botany) a thick horizontal underground stem of plants such as the mint and iris whose buds develop new roots and shoots. Also called: rootstock or rootstalk
[C19: from New Latin rhizoma, from Greek, from rhiza a root]
rhizomatous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

rhi•zome

(ˈraɪ zoʊm)

n.
a rootlike underground stem, commonly horizontal in position, that usu. produces roots below and sends up shoots progressively from the upper surface.
[1835–45; < New Latin rhizoma < Greek rhízōma root, stem = rhizō-, variant s. of rhizoûn to fix firmly, take root (derivative of rhíza root1) + -ma n. suffix of result]
rhi•zom′a•tous (-ˈzɒm ə təs, -ˈzoʊ mə-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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rhizome

rhi·zome

(rī′zōm′)
A plant stem that grows horizontally under or along the ground and often sends out roots and shoots. New plants develop from the shoots. Ginger, iris, and violets have rhizomes. Also called rootstock. Compare bulb, corm, runner, tuber.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhizome - a horizontal plant stem with shoots above and roots below serving as a reproductive structurerhizome - a horizontal plant stem with shoots above and roots below serving as a reproductive structure
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
oddenek
maavarsi
rizóma

rhizome

[ˈraɪzəʊm] Nrizoma m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

rhizome

[ˈraɪzəʊm] nrhizome m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rhizome

nRhizom nt, → Wurzelstock m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

rhizome

[ˈraɪzəʊm] nrizoma m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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