Rhodes


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Rhodes

 (rōdz)
An island of southeast Greece in the Aegean Sea off southwest Turkey. It is the largest of the Dodecanese Islands and was colonized by Dorians from Argos before 1000 bc and strongly influenced by the Minoan culture of Crete. The harbor of the ancient city of Rhodes, on the northeast end of the island, was the site of the Colossus of Rhodes, a bronze statue erected 292-280 bc that was one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Rhodes

(rəʊdz)
n
1. (Placename) a Greek island in the SE Aegean Sea, about 16 km (10 miles) off the Turkish coast: the largest of the Dodecanese and the most easterly island in the Aegean. Capital: Rhodes. Pop (municipality): 55 086 (2001). Area: 1400 sq km (540 sq miles)
2. (Placename) a port on this island, in the NE: founded in 408 bc; of great commercial and political importance in the 3rd century bc; suffered several earthquakes, notably in 225, when the Colossus was destroyed. Pop: 41 000 (latest est)
Ancient Greek name: Rhodos Modern Greek name: Ródhos

Rhodes

(rəʊdz)
n
(Biography) Cecil John. 1853–1902, British colonial financier and statesman in South Africa. He made a fortune in diamond and gold mining and, as prime minister of the Cape Colony (1890–96), he helped to extend British territory. He established the annual Rhodes scholarships to Oxford. See Rhodes scholarship

Rhodes

(roʊdz)

n.
1. Cecil John, 1853–1902, English capitalist and administrator in S Africa.
2. Greek, Rhodos.
a. a Greek island in the SE Aegean, off the SW coast of Turkey: largest Dodecanese Island. 66,606; 542 sq. mi. (1404 sq. km).
b. a seaport on Rhodes. 32,019.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rhodes - British colonial financier and statesman in South AfricaRhodes - British colonial financier and statesman in South Africa; made a fortune in gold and diamond mining; helped colonize the territory now known as Zimbabwe; he endowed annual fellowships for British Commonwealth and United States students to study at Oxford University (1853-1902)
2.Rhodes - a Greek island in the southeast Aegean Sea 10 miles off the Turkish coast; the largest of the Dodecanese; it was colonized before 1000 BC by Dorians from Argos; site of the Colossus of Rhodes
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Dhodhekanisos, Dodecanese - a group of islands in the southeast Aegean Sea
Translations

Rhodes

[rəʊdz] NRodas f

Rhodes

[ˈrəʊdz] nRhodes f

Rhodes

nRhodos nt; in Rhodesauf Rhodos

Rhodes

[rəʊdz] nRodi f
References in classic literature ?
Among other things, he said that when he was at Rhodes he had leaped to such a distance that no man of his day could leap anywhere near him as to that, there were in Rhodes many persons who saw him do it and whom he could call as witnesses.
In the same year, some persons who had been persecuted in Massachusetts went to the Isle of Rhodes, since called Rhode Island, and settled there.
This island seems formed by nature to be the mistress of Greece, for it is entirely surrounded by a navigable ocean which washes almost all the maritime parts of that country, and is not far distant on the one side from Peloponnesus, on the other, which looks towards Asia, from Triopium and Rhodes. By means of this situation Minos acquired the empire of the sea and the islands; some of which he subdued, in others planted colonies: at last he died at Camicus while he was attacking Sicily.
Proclus on Works and Days, 828: Some make the "Divination by Birds", which Apollonius of Rhodes rejects as spurious, follow this verse ("Works and Days", 828).
It was indeed the ancient abode of Proteus, the old shepherd of Neptune's flocks, now the Island of Scarpanto, situated between Rhodes and Crete.
Take the Colossus of Rhodes, for instance, that's worth something.
"And it is not long since a knight of the island of Rhodes that was hardy and valiant said that he would kiss her.
Tlepolemus, son of Hercules, a man both brave and large of stature, brought nine ships of lordly warriors from Rhodes. These dwelt in Rhodes which is divided among the three cities of Lindus, Ielysus, and Cameirus, that lies upon the chalk.
There you stand, a hundred feet above the silent decks, striding along the deep, as if the masts were gigantic stilts, while beneath you and between your legs, as it were, swim the hugest monsters of the sea, even as ships once sailed between the boots of the famous Colossus at old Rhodes. There you stand, lost in the infinite series of the sea, with nothing ruffled but the waves.
He traveled on those feet and his hands, and was as sway-backed as if the Colossus of Rhodes had been riding him.
New Jersey and Rhode Island, upon all occasions, discovered a warm zeal for the independence of Vermont; and Maryland, till alarmed by the appearance of a connection between Canada and that State, entered deeply into the same views.
* In the state of Rhode Island there is a bay called Narragansett, so named after a powerful tribe of Indians, which formerly dwelt on its banks.