Rhodesia and Nyasaland


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Rhodesia and Nyasaland

A former colonial federation (1953-1963) of south-central Africa that included the present-day countries of Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Malawi.
References in periodicals archive ?
The University College of Rhodesia and Nyasaland (UCRN), like most African colonial universities, was designed as an elite institution.
1953 Federal Constitution of Rhodesia and Nyasaland goes into effect.
(19) To secure their power, whites in Zambia joined with those in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and Nyasaland (Malawi) and formed the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. (20) Africans strongly opposed the establishment of the federation because they felt that, as the black majority, they were seriously discriminated against by the white minority in all spheres of nationhood--religious, political, economic, and social.
The country Rhodesia and Nyasaland was administrated by the British Crown and subsequently named after Cecil Rhodes in recognition of his achievement in bringing order and relative stability in an area where tribal violence and disorder was endemic.
From 1953 to 1963, the country was part of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland (present day Malawi).
Similarly, when the Northern Rhodesian African National Congress under Harry Mwaanga Nkumbula declared Two Days of Prayer in 1953 in protests against the introduction of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, African Assistants at the Institute organised a work boycott with the full support of the organisation.
In discussing the establishment of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, passing reference is made to the need "to harness rivers, to develop power to meet the needs of industry" without indicating why hydroelectric power was essential, why the Zambezi rather than the Kafue River was dammed, or how Nyasaland would benefit (79).
On February 26, 1959 an Emergency was declared not only throughout Southern Rhodesia but also throughout Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland, today's Zambia and Malawi respectively.
Beginning during the 'Scramble for Africa' and the heyday of imperialism, the business came through the colonial period, the ill-fated Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, and the triumph of African nationalism to survive into the era of emerging markets and liberalisation.
The Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland was affected by the emergence of African Congress movements in its constituent territories, fanning the flames of black nationalism, demanding freedom from white rule.
In 1952, a year before the establishment of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, Mutende was closed down.