rhomboid

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rhom·boid

 (rŏm′boid′)
n.
A parallelogram with unequal adjacent sides, especially one having oblique angles.
adj. also rhom·boi·dal (-boid′l)
Shaped like a rhombus or rhomboid.

rhomboid

(ˈrɒmbɔɪd)
n
(Mathematics) a parallelogram having adjacent sides of unequal length
adj
(Mathematics) having such a shape
[C16: from Late Latin rhomboides, from Greek rhomboeidēs shaped like a rhombus]

rhom•boid

(ˈrɒm bɔɪd)

n.
1. an oblique-angled parallelogram with only the opposite sides equal.
adj.
3. Also, rhom•boi′dal. having a form similar to that of a rhombus; shaped like a rhomboid.
[1560–70; < Late Latin rhomboīdes < Greek rhomboeidḕs (schêma) rhomboid (form, shape). See rhombus, -oid]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhomboid - a parallelogram with adjacent sides of unequal lengthsrhomboid - a parallelogram with adjacent sides of unequal lengths; an oblique-angled parallelogram with only the opposite sides equal
parallelogram - a quadrilateral whose opposite sides are both parallel and equal in length
2.rhomboid - any of several muscles of the upper back that help move the shoulder blade
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
greater rhomboid muscle, musculus rhomboideus major, rhomboideus major muscle - rhomboid muscle that draws the scapula toward the spinal column
lesser rhomboid muscle, musculus rhomboideus minor, rhomboid minor muscle - rhomboid muscle that draws the scapula toward the vertebral column and slightly upward
Adj.1.rhomboid - shaped like a rhombus or rhomboid; "rhomboidal shapes"
Translations

rhomboid

[ˈrɒmbɔɪd]
A. ADJromboidal
B. Nromboide m

rhomboid

nRhomboid nt
adjrhomboid
References in periodicals archive ?
Each had electromyographical confirmation of chronic neurogenic changes in the supraspinati, infraspinati and rhomboid muscles with normal findings in the trapezius, deltoid and serratus anterior.
It's to engage your rhomboid muscles and continually pinch them until the shot breaks.
If you sometimes feel pain or discomfort between your shoulder blades, your rhomboid muscles may be the culprits.
The posterior thoracic muscles, namely, the middle and lower trapezius and rhomboid muscles, were shown to be weak and lengthened.