Rhus glabra


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Noun1.Rhus glabra - common nonpoisonous shrub of eastern North America with waxy compound leaves and green paniculate flowers followed by red berriesRhus glabra - common nonpoisonous shrub of eastern North America with waxy compound leaves and green paniculate flowers followed by red berries
shumac, sumach, sumac - a shrub or tree of the genus Rhus (usually limited to the non-poisonous members of the genus)
References in classic literature ?
The sumach (Rhus glabra) grew luxuriantly about the house, pushing up through the embankment which I had made, and growing five or six feet the first season.
The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the extent of fluctuating asymmetry in Rhus glabra, the smooth sumac (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), could be used as a suitable bioindicator of lead, zinc, and cadmium contamination at the Tar Creek Superfund site (near Picher) in northeastern Oklahoma.
Remedies: Aloe, Ambra, Androctonus, Aristolochia, Aurum Sulphuricum, Azadirachta, Baryta lodata, Baryta Sulphurica, Cereus Serpentinus, Cicuta, Coca, Coceinum, Comocladia, Curare, Cycloamen, Fumaria, Gratiola, Homarus, Hura, Hydrastus, Hydrocotyle, Indolum, Kola nut, Lac Defloratum, Laurocerasus, Ledum, Mandragora, Mephites, Ocimum sanctum, Rhus glabra, Secale, Sepia, Skatolum, Solanum Tuberosum Aegrotans, Spirea.
Another great addition is Rhus glabra, whose deep blue-green leaves turn a brilliant red in autumn.
Trees and shrubs that were adapted to drier conditions included bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa), bitternut hickory (Carya cordiformis), smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) and wolfberry (Symphoricarpos occidentalis) (Weaver, 1965).
Smooth Sumac, Rhus glabra, Winged Sumac, Rhus copallinum, and Staghorn Sumac, Rhus hirta, can all be found in Mississippi, and the dazzling red foliage of this large shrub in the fall will stop traffic.
Lichens were more common in sunnier areas along edges of woods or on open grown Crataegus mollis and Rhus glabra. Human influences include the planting of corn (Zea mays) to attract wildlife.
The fruit of Rhus glabra (smooth sumac) can be used to make a lemonade-type drink.