Rhyacotriton


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Noun1.Rhyacotriton - olympic salamanders
amphibian genus - any genus of amphibians
Dicamptodontidae, family Dicamptodontidae - large and small highly aquatic salamanders
olympic salamander, Rhyacotriton olympicus - small large-eyed semiaquatic salamander of the United States Northwest
References in periodicals archive ?
The Coastal giant salamander, Dicamptodon tenebrosus, and the Cascade torrent salamander, Rhyacotriton cascadae, often occur together in Oregon Cascades streams (Nussbaum, 1976; Hayes, 2005; Jones and Welsh, 2005).
Prey items of adult Rhyacotriton included amphipods, small snails, worms, springtails, larval flies and stoneflies, and beetles (Bury and Martin, 1967; Bury, 1970; Nussbaum et al., 1983).
Here, we provide data on the reproductive biology of Rhyacotriton and describe the morphology of the epididymal complex of the genital kidney and the collecting ducts of the pelvic kidney.
Urogenital Anatomy of Rhyacotriton--Male specimens of Rhyacotriton olympicus and R.
Other cryptic or poorly differentiated species of amphibians occur in western North America, such as salamanders in the genera Dicamptodon and Rhyacotriton (Good 1989; Good and Wake 1992).
We uncovered the 1st Rhyacotriton olympicus oviposition site ever found on 10 August 2016.
However, our sole captive-reared hatchling was similar in size to the few other reports for Rhyacotriton. Specifically, it was slightly smaller (14.7 mm SVL) than the smallest larvae reported for the Cascade Torrent Salamander (15.8 mm SVL) in the Columbia River Gorge and slightly larger than the smallest larvae reported for the Southern Torrent Salamander in coastal Oregon (13.5 mm SVL; Nussbaum and Tait 1977).
Geographic variation and speciation of the torrent salamanders of the genus Rhyacotriton (Caudata: Ryacotritonidae).
A combined y and r (r + y, table 1) is standard in Andrias, Rhyacotriton, sirenids, and proteids (table 5).
Other stream-associated amphibians known to inhabit our study area include Coastal Giant Salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus), California Giant Salamanders (Dicamptodon ensatus), Southern Torrent Salamanders (Rhyacotriton vnriegatus), Red-bellied Newts (Taricha rivularis), and Coastal Tailed Frogs, with the latter 4 species also having Species of Special Concern status in California (Aguilar and others 2013; Thomson and others 2016).
This information lack is acute for the Columbia Torrent Salamander, Rhyacotriton kezeri, a species that is of conservation concern throughout its range.
The Yaquina and Smith Rivers of the central Oregon and northern California coasts, respectively, seem to act as barriers to dispersal in Rhyacotriton variegatus (Southern Torrent Salamander; Miller and others 2006), while the Willamette River of Oregon defines the species boundaries between R.