rhyme scheme

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rhyme scheme

n.
The arrangement of rhymes in a poem or stanza.

rhyme′ scheme`


n.
the pattern of rhyme in a poem, often symbolized by letters, as ababbcc for rhyme royal.
[1930–35]
References in periodicals archive ?
The rhyming structure of the text really adds to the story; it reads well and the rhyming pattern is not as predictable as some.
Shakespeare's deliberate emphasis of the word "state" is also shown in his rhyming pattern of the sonnet, as he uses it as a rhyming word in both lines two and ten:
The quintain rhyming pattern is slightly different from that of "Cottar's Girl," but the meter swells and shrinks to emphasize the complexity of this "wise" creature.
The rhyming pattern helps carry the reader through the story, laughing aloud at the silliness and feeling the warmth and love that the children share with their mother, on this special day.
Burmese nationalism and the preservation of cultural symbols--perhaps expectedly under the strong arm of British colonization--and the preservation of a climbing rhyme first used in the pagan era (its rhyme scheme operated a 4-3-2 rhyming pattern of four syllables per line, the last or fourth syllable of the first line rhyming with the third syllable of the next line and the second syllable of the third line, and so on, usually ending with a line of seven syllables).
The students deconstructed limericks, identified rhyming pattern and counted syllables to come up with the Limerick Formula.
A classic 'Broadway' song, Hernando's Hideaway, demonstrates a rhyming pattern involving triplet groups such as 'silhouettes .
We mark the rhyming pattern if there is one and we mark repeated patterns.
38) The rhyming pattern has led critics to assume that Webster made significant changes to the conventional form.
There is no fixed rhyming pattern, although there is a great deal of half-rhyme and half heard echoes.
In many poems and rhymes, the rhyming pattern is ABAB and so the rhyming words are not in consecutive lines, but rather in every other line.
With pattern blocks or any similar material, students can map out the rhyming pattern of a particular nursery rhyme.