Richard I


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Rich·ard I

 (rĭch′ərd) Known as "Coeur de Lion" or "the Lion-Hearted." 1157-1199.
King of England (1189-1199). A leader of the Third Crusade (1190-1192), he was captured in Austria (1192) and held as a prisoner by Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI until England ransomed him in 1194.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Richard I

(ˈrɪtʃəd)
n
(Biography) nicknamed Coeur de Lion or the Lion-Heart. 1157–99, king of England (1189–99); a leader of the third crusade (joining it in 1191). On his way home, he was captured in Austria (1192) and held to ransom. After a brief return to England, where he was crowned again (1194), he spent the rest of his life in France
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Richard I - son of Henry II and King of England from 1189 to 1199Richard I - son of Henry II and King of England from 1189 to 1199; a leader of the Third Crusade; on his way home from the crusade he was captured and held prisoner in the Holy Roman Empire until England ransomed him in 1194 (1157-1199)
Plantagenet, Plantagenet line - the family name of a line of English kings that reigned from 1154 to 1485
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lands around Woolsington Hall are thought to have originally been owned by Tynemouth Priory and were mentioned in Richard I's charter of 1189 and subsequent ref-erences - a legacy of this is the Monk's Hut building on the estate.
The study is the first biochemical look at the heart of Richard I, who died in 1199.
Scientific analysis of King Richard I's heart shows that Christians in the 12th century did embalm church leaders and royalty.
The Three Richards: Richard I, Richard II and Richard III, by Nigel Saul.
The Three Richards Richard I, Richard II and Richard III