Richard II


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Richard II

1367-1400.
King of England (1377-1399). He quelled the Peasants' Revolt in 1381 but spent the rest of his reign at odds with the nobles in Parliament. He was deposed (1399) and imprisoned by Henry of Bolingbroke, who succeeded him as Henry IV.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Richard II

n
(Biography) 1367–1400, king of England (1377–99), whose reign was troubled by popular discontent and baronial opposition. He was forced to abdicate in favour of Henry Bolingbroke, who became Henry IV
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Richard II - King of England from 1377 to 1399Richard II - King of England from 1377 to 1399; he suppressed the Peasant's Revolt in 1381 but his reign was marked by popular discontent and baronial opposition in British Parliament and he was forced to abdicate in 1399 (1367-1400)
Plantagenet, Plantagenet line - the family name of a line of English kings that reigned from 1154 to 1485
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References in classic literature ?
And in the time of which we have been reading, in the England where Edward III and Richard II ruled, where Langland sadly dreamed and Wyclif boldly wrote and preached, there lived a man who has left for us a clear and truthful picture of those times.
Besides his town palace, the Marquis had castles and palaces in various quarters of the three kingdoms, whereof the descriptions may be found in the road-books--Castle Strongbow, with its woods, on the Shannon shore; Gaunt Castle, in Carmarthenshire, where Richard II was taken prisoner--Gauntly Hall in Yorkshire, where I have been informed there were two hundred silver teapots for the breakfasts of the guests of the house, with everything to correspond in splendour; and Stillbrook in Hampshire, which was my lord's farm, an humble place of residence, of which we all remember the wonderful furniture which was sold at my lord's demise by a late celebrated auctioneer.
Richard II had a coat, valued at thirty thousand marks, which was covered with balas rubies.
I think the following from Shakespeare's Richard II, spoken by John of Gaunt as he is dying in 1399 during the Wars of the Roses, is very apt about the mess we are in today.
She places herself at the heart of two treasonous plots against King Henry IV with the aim of restoring King Richard II to the throne.
1377: Richard II inherited the English throne, at 10.
In this exclusive interview, she tells Belinda Otas why her production of Shakespeare's Richard II has an all women-of-colour ensemble at a time when the UK is facing up to the reality of Brexit and people are grappling with questions about identity and nationhood.
Unable to claim the throne for himself, he ensured that his son Henry usurped the throne from the rightful king, Richard II.
The castle was built by Edward I and was where Richard II was deposed, featuring in Shakespeare's King Richard II.
The castle (pictured above) was built by Edward I and was where Richard II was deposed, featuring in Shakespeare's King Richard II.
The founding production of Richard II, a play never before staged in France, in the Honor Court of the Popes' Palace, an open-air, monumental, medieval venue, provided Vilar with a unique opportunity to regenerate the theater outside Paris, while breaking away from the conventions of the Italian-style playhouse.
The duke's end foreshadowed that of Richard II. In October 1399 Henry IV deposed him and usurped the English throne, justifying his actions on the grounds that Richard's tyrannous misgovernment was destroying the realm.