Richard II


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Related to Richard II: Richard III

Richard II

1367-1400.
King of England (1377-1399). He quelled the Peasants' Revolt in 1381 but spent the rest of his reign at odds with the nobles in Parliament. He was deposed (1399) and imprisoned by Henry of Bolingbroke, who succeeded him as Henry IV.

Richard II

n
(Biography) 1367–1400, king of England (1377–99), whose reign was troubled by popular discontent and baronial opposition. He was forced to abdicate in favour of Henry Bolingbroke, who became Henry IV
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Richard II - King of England from 1377 to 1399Richard II - King of England from 1377 to 1399; he suppressed the Peasant's Revolt in 1381 but his reign was marked by popular discontent and baronial opposition in British Parliament and he was forced to abdicate in 1399 (1367-1400)
Plantagenet, Plantagenet line - the family name of a line of English kings that reigned from 1154 to 1485
References in classic literature ?
And in the time of which we have been reading, in the England where Edward III and Richard II ruled, where Langland sadly dreamed and Wyclif boldly wrote and preached, there lived a man who has left for us a clear and truthful picture of those times.
Besides his town palace, the Marquis had castles and palaces in various quarters of the three kingdoms, whereof the descriptions may be found in the road-books--Castle Strongbow, with its woods, on the Shannon shore; Gaunt Castle, in Carmarthenshire, where Richard II was taken prisoner--Gauntly Hall in Yorkshire, where I have been informed there were two hundred silver teapots for the breakfasts of the guests of the house, with everything to correspond in splendour; and Stillbrook in Hampshire, which was my lord's farm, an humble place of residence, of which we all remember the wonderful furniture which was sold at my lord's demise by a late celebrated auctioneer.
Richard II had a coat, valued at thirty thousand marks, which was covered with balas rubies.
It is this puzzle of possibly arbitrary allegations that makes the beginning of Richard II so fascinating, since it also sets the tone for the decisions that trigger the rest of the action.
The monument is featured in Shakespeare's Richard II - it is the setting where Richard II is captured by Henry Bolingbroke, ultimately leading to Richard's abdication and the ascension of King Henry IV.
FLINT CASTLE While Verona may be best known for its iconic balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet, Flint provides the backdrop for Shakespeare's pivotal scene in his history play Richard II.
1399: The first British monarch to abdicate, Richard II, was replaced by Bolingbroke to whom he had surrendered without a fight.
Above, riders from all over the country were converging on Tynemouth for the National Scooter Riders |Association rally; below, right, Derek Jacobi who was appearing in Richard II and Richard III at the Theatre Royal in Newcastle; bottom, boxer Frank Bruno gets into his stride in the Great North Run.
IN the deposition scene of Richard II, Shakespeare's king obsessively repeats the word "myself.
Each one will be followed by a live Q&A on Twitter with the main actor, such as Dr Who star Tennant in Richard II.
1377: Richard II inherited the English throne, |aged 10.
Richard II marks an exciting advance in the development of Shakespeare's artistry.