Richards


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
click for a larger image
Ellen Swallow Richards

Rich·ards

 (rĭch′ərdz), Ellen Swallow 1842-1911.
American chemist and educator whose research on water quality led to the establishment of the first modern sewage treatment plant, and who founded the discipline of home economics.

Richards

, Keith Born 1943.
British rock musician who, as lead guitarist for the Rolling Stones, cowrote such songs as "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" (1965) and "Sympathy for the Devil" (1968) with Mick Jagger.

Richards

, Theodore William 1868-1928.
American chemist. He won a 1914 Nobel Prize for finding the atomic weights of numerous elements.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Richards

(ˈrɪtʃədz)
n
1. (Biography) I(vor) A(rmstrong). 1893–1979, British literary critic and linguist, who, with C. K. Ogden, wrote The Meaning of Meaning (1923) and devised Basic English
2. (Biography) Sir Gordon. 1904–86, English flat-racing jockey: champion jockey 26 times between 1925 and 1953; won 4870 races, including fourteen English classics
3. (Biography) Sir Viv, full name Isaac Vivian Alexander Richards. born 1952, West Indian cricketer, born in Antigua; played in 121 tests, 50 as captain; scored 8,540 test runs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Rich•ards

(ˈrɪtʃ ərdz)

n.
I(vor) A(rmstrong), 1893–1979, English literary critic in the U.S.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Richards - English literary critic who collaborated with C. K. Ogden and contributed to the development of Basic English (1893-1979)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Richard was now seated on the stool again, and, the black taking the hind seat, the steeds were put in motion toward home, As they dashed down the hill on a fast trot, the driver occasionally turned his face to Aggy, and continued speaking; for, notwithstanding their recent rupture, the most perfect cordiality was again existing between them,
The pleasure of this discovery had put Richard in such a good humor, that the negro’s fears in some measure vanished, and he remembered the stocking of Santa Claus.
Nor was he less surprised to see Richard surrounded by so many silvan attendants, the outlaws, as they seemed to be, of the forest, and a perilous retinue therefore for a prince.
``Fear not, Wilfred,'' he said, ``to address Richard Plantagenet as himself, since thou seest him in the company of true English hearts, although it may be they have been urged a few steps aside by warm English blood.''
Lastly, he was a charming fellow and showed that he was not lacking in intelligence, for, as soon as he made up his mind to be a sleeping partner in the Opera, he selected the best possible active manager and went straight to Firmin Richard.
Firmin Richard was a very distinguished composer, who had published a number of successful pieces of all kinds and who liked nearly every form of music and every sort of musician.
"He is at meat, good knight, and he looketh for thy coming," quoth the porter, "for, if I mistake not, thou art Sir Richard of the Lea."
"I am Sir Richard of the Lea; then I will go seek him forthwith," said the Knight.
Without an instant's hesitation, Natalie darted back to her own door, just in time to escape Richard Turlington descending the cabin stairs.
"Why who are you to come thus brawling upon my premises?" asked a haughty voice; and Sir Richard himself stepped forth upon the turret.
We held many consultations about what Richard was to be, first without Mr.
Only the last ship, the Revenge, commanded by the Rear-Admiral Sir Richard Grenville, lost the wind and was caught between two great squadrons of the Spanish.