Richelieu


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Related to Richelieu: Cardinal Richelieu

Ri·che·lieu

 (rĭsh′ə-lo͞o′)
A river of southern Quebec, Canada, flowing about 170 km (105 mi) north from Lake Champlain to the St. Lawrence River.

Ri·che·lieu

 (rĭsh′ə-lo͞o′, rē-shə-lyœ′), Duc de Title of Armand Jean du Plessis. 1585-1642.
French cardinal and politician. As chief minister of Louis XIII he worked to strengthen the authority of the monarchy and directed France during the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Richelieu

(ˈrɪʃəˌljɜː; French riʃəljø)
n
(Biography) Armand Jean du Plessis (armɑ̃ ʒɑ̃ dy plɛsi). 1585–1642, French statesman and cardinal, principal minister to Louis XIII and virtual ruler of France (1624–42). He destroyed the power of the Huguenots and strengthened the crown in France and the role of France in Europe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Rich•e•lieu

(ˈrɪʃ əˌlu; Fr. riʃəˈlyœ)

n.
1. Armand Jean du Plessis (ʒɑ̃) Duc de, 1585–1642, French cardinal and statesman.
2. a river in SE Canada, in Quebec, flowing N from Lake Champlain to the St. Lawrence. 210 mi. (340 km) long.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Richelieu - French prelate and statesmanRichelieu - French prelate and statesman; principal minister to Louis XIII (1585-1642)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Any one who happened at that moment to contemplate that red simar -- the gorgeous robe of office -- and the rich lace, or who gazed on that pale brow, bent in anxious meditation, might, in the solitude of that apartment, combined with the silence of the ante-chambers and the measured paces of the guards upon the landing-place, have fancied that the shade of Cardinal Richelieu lingered still in his accustomed haunt.
France enfeebled, the authority of her sovereign contemned, her nobles returning to their former turbulence and insolence, her enemies within her frontiers -- all proved the great Richelieu no longer in existence.
"Richelieu, whom they hated during his lifetime and whom they now praise after his death, was even less popular than I am.
He was the son of a banker at Lyons named Particelli, who, after becoming a bankrupt, chose to change his name to Emery; and Cardinal Richelieu having discovered in him great financial aptitude, had introduced him with a strong recommendation to Louis XIII.
"Sire," replied Richelieu, "rest assured that Particelli, the man to whom your majesty refers, has been hanged."
One was a bronze image of the Duc de Richelieu, grand-nephew of the splendid Cardinal.
de Richelieu, the first minister of my grandmother, Marie de Medici, was simply bishop of Lucon, as you are bishop of Vannes."
de Richelieu, by means of the queen's protection, soon became cardinal."
de Richelieu, of whom we were speaking just now, was very much to blame in the fixed idea he had of governing France alone, unaided.
This man was Armand Jean Duplessis, Cardinal de Richelieu; not such as he is now represented--broken down like an old man, suffering like a martyr, his body bent, his voice failing, buried in a large armchair as in an anticipated tomb; no longer living but by the strength of his genius, and no longer maintaining the struggle with Europe but by the eternal application of his thoughts--but such as he really was at this period; that is to say, an active and gallant cavalier, already weak of body, but sustained by that moral power which made of him one of the most extraordinary men that ever lived, preparing, after having supported the Duc de Nevers in his duchy of Mantua, after having taken Nimes, Castres, and Uzes, to drive the English from the Isle of Re and lay siege to La Rochelle.
"She said that the Cardinal de Richelieu had drawn the Duke of Buckingham to Paris to ruin him and to ruin the queen."
Besides," added he, in a low voice, "that would be a resolution, and no resolutions have been formed since Monsieur le Cardinal de Richelieu died.