Rickover


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Rick·o·ver

 (rĭk′ō′vər), Hyman George 1900-1986.
American admiral who advocated and greatly contributed to the development of nuclear submarines and ships. He was also an outspoken critic of the American educational system.

Rick•o•ver

(ˈrɪk oʊ vər)

n.
Hyman George, 1900–86, U.S. naval officer, born in Poland: helped to develop the nuclear submarine.
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Noun1.Rickover - United States admiral who advocated the development of nuclear submarines (1900-1986)
References in periodicals archive ?
He had a habit of breaking Navy crockery--for example, by forcing the Naval Academy to put more humanities in its curriculum, and by engineering the retirement of Admiral Hyman Rickover (the story of Rickover's tantrum in his departing courtesy call with Ronald Reagan is told with great relish at the beginning of Lehman's memoir Command of the Sea).
Hyman Rickover made a unique impact on American and Navy culture.
A former Navy nuclear engineer who had served under the demanding Admiral Hyman Rickover , Carter cancelled the B-1 bomber and fought for a U.
Rickover and nuclear power, as well as the reliability issues of the Navy's "3-T" missile (Talos, Terrier, and Tarter) and the move toward a "standard missile" replacement program.
Hyman Rickover, founder of the nuclear navy, put it this way:
For example, Admiral Rickover, the father of the commercial nuclear reactor and the nuclear navy, when he faced the accelerating technological challenges in the early nuclear age, lamented the shortage of technically qualified sailors and officers entering the service.
Hyman Rickover, the father of the nuclear Navy -- was powered by a custom-built miniature nuclear reactor and could dive to 3,000 feet.
The teams will be a mix of Chicago's sports and media personalities, Alpari World Match Racing Tour professional sailors, and lucky students from Chicago Public Schools Rickover Academy.
Naval Reactors Branch, headed by Admiral Hyman Rickover.
Hyman Rickover wrote, "Unless you can point your finger at the man who is responsible when something goes wrong, then you have never had anyone really responsible.
US Admiral Hyman Rickover had said it was because the US high school system was incapable of producing an adequate supply of scientists.