Right line


Also found in: Encyclopedia.
a straight line; the shortest line that can be drawn between two points.
See under Line.

See also: Line, Right

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in classic literature ?
"There are three 'tall trees'" said he, "about in the right line from Skeleton Island.
Soon they were chatting together, with intervals of listening; and not long after, hearing no further sound, they shouldered the tools and set forth again, Merry walking first with Silver's compass to keep them on the right line with Skeleton Island.
It is a point of great delicacy, and you must assist us in our endeavours to choose exactly the right line of conduct."
A nervous contraction at one corner of her mouth drew up the lips out of the symmetrically right line, when, they moved.
One, however, which was less regular than the others, deviated from a right line, at the most considerable bend, to the amount of thirty-three degrees.
When beneath its walls, I perceived decay had made progress, even in seven months: many a window showed black gaps deprived of glass; and slates jutted off here and there, beyond the right line of the roof, to be gradually worked off in coming autumn storms.
His shoulders were square, in one sense at least, being in a right line from one side to the other; but they were so narrow, that the long dangling arms they supported seemed to issue out of his back.
If its homing instinct led it upon the right line, there can be no doubt that somewhere out in the wastes of the Atlantic the last European pterodactyl found its end.
"I hoped to get round you, but you took up the right line at once!"
The straight warp of necessity, not to be swerved from its ultimate course --its every alternating vibration, indeed, only tending to that; free will still free to ply her shuttle between given threads; and chance, though restrained in its play within the right lines of necessity, and sideways in its motions directed by free will, though thus prescribed to by both, chance by turns rules either, and has the last featuring blow at events.
And as the former owes its generality not to its being the sign of an abstract or general line, but of all particular right lines that may possibly exist, so the latter must be thought to derive its generality from the same cause, namely, the various particular lines which it indifferently denotes." *
"In these conditions, it becomes difficult for a leg-spinner to grip the ball, especially when he's not getting the right line and length.