right to know


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right to know

or right-to-know (rīt′tə-nō′)
adj.
Of or relating to policies and laws that make some governmental records and other information available to a person who can demonstrate a right or need to know the contents.
References in classic literature ?
But the reader has a right to know all about it even before our hero, and therefore we shall not make him wait.
I claim as my right to know the name of that enemy.
Grose looked straight out of the window, but I felt that, hypothetically, I had a right to know what young persons engaged for Bly were expected to do.
Very well," he decided, "under the circumstances you have the right to know what my message meant.
Her knowledge of literature and art surprised him, while deep down was the feeling that a girl who knew such things had no right to know how to rig tackles, heave up anchors, and sail schooners around the South Seas.
But if I had fractured every limb, and still preserved my senses, you should not bandage one till you had told me what I have the right to know.
I shall lower myself, indeed, if I gain my release by hiding from him what he has a right to know.
Well," says I, growing a bit bolder, "if I'm to choose, I declare I have a right to know what's what, and why you're here, and where my friends are.
Tell me what he said," she insisted, "I have a right to know.
You, who saved me, have a right to know what the provocation was that drove me to drowning myself, and what my situation is, now that I am (thanks to you) still a living woman.
I don't wish you to tell things to everyone, of course, but to me you may, and you must, because I have a right to know.
And there was another of our acquaintances who was also to be left behind, a non-combatant, and whose emotions and behaviour we have therefore a right to know.