rigid designator


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rigid designator

n
(Logic) logic an expression that identifies the same individual in every possible world: for example, "Shakespeare" is a rigid designator since it is possible that Shakespeare might not have been a playwright but not that he might not have been Shakespeare
References in periodicals archive ?
But it's full of (lowercased) usages such as rigid designator, a priori necessary identity, a posteriori contingently true.
Planet Venus, for instance, will (likely) always be identified by the name Venus, which is its rigid designator, even though a descriptive sentence like "the second closest planet to the Sun" could be used to replace it.
Cook, Monte, 1980, "If 'Cat' is a Rigid Designator, What Does it Designate?
The division into essential and contingent properties enables him to introduce the concept of rigid designator.
This predicts that a complex demonstrative will not behave like a rigid designator in modal evaluation, when the speaker has only a descriptive intention.
10) To this end, he argues with Kripke, whose idea of the rigid designator enables a fixing of reference.
This had caused the value of the sign to become contingent upon other denominations, rupturing its "natural" relationship with a "given" origin performing as rigid designator.
According to Lyotard, a rigid designator "does not .
In response to this problem I distinguished between two types of rigid designator.
The impression is thus created that whether or not a rigid designator refers to something in some non-actual possible world depends on the ontological furniture of that world.
Kripke cannot specify, not even sketch, what kind of non-rigid designator D1 is associated with a rigid designator [R.
For both the notion of possible worlds and the rigid designator theory are circular, and modalism depends on a prior commitment to a physico-chemical reduction of the nature of reality.