rigsdaler


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rigsdaler

(ˈrɪɡzˌdɑːlə)
n
(Currencies) another word for rix-dollar
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A rix-dollar, or rigsdaler, references the currency used at the time.
In 1819, when Andersen arrived without a single rigsdaler in Copenhagen (having left his widowed mother behind in Odense), he "was quite calm because [he] trusted blindly in Our Lord." Yet that faith, however genuine, was perhaps a less reliable buoy than his observation about "the heroes in all the tales," that "things always went well in the comedies and stories."
The currencies of the three countries in fact already circulated at a simplified fixed exchange rate of 1 Norwegian speciedaler = 2 Danish rigsdaler = 4 Swedish rigsdaler, since the public generally ignored differences of less than 1 per cent (Garelli, 1946).
He is given a rigsdaler, a paper bill worth about a German mark, by the local parson for writing a letter for him, and he copies it by hand for practice in drawing the ornate lettering.
He was also a mineral collector, and his Kongsberg silver specimens were said to be worth 10,000 rigsdaler alone, while his mineral collection as a whole was valued at 25,000 rigsdaler.
Other early collections that ultimately went to the University include those of Joachim Cappel (1707-1784), a German pharmacist in Copenhagen who owned fine Faeroes specimens; Terkel Kleve (or Klevenfeldt) (1710-1777), a Copenhagen historian whose costly collection included specimens of Sumatran gold; Andreas Birch (1716-1763), a Danish "Royal Mineral Inspector" whose collection of Kongsberg silvers and zeolites were exhibited in part at a meeting of the Royal Society in 1752; Peter Abildgaard (1740-1801), founder of the first Danish veterinary school, whose extensive mineral collection was purchased by the Royal Natural History Museum for 4,000 rigsdaler; Count S.
Together these collections, plus a collection acquired from Erich Pontoppidan, were valued at 13,500 rigsdaler. Moltke donated them all to the University in 1812, where for over 160 years they continued to be known as "Count Moltke's Mineralogical Museum."