Li Bai

(redirected from Rihaku)

Li Bai

 (lē′ bī′)
See Li Po.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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In Cathay, Pound calls Li Bai (0,Li Po, Li Bo, Ri Haku), by the name Rihaku. Pound's poetry is great in and of itself, making the reader wonder about the greatness of the original Chinese, but never being identical to it or its equivalent.
specifically the piquant Rihaku junmai ginjo is a symphony that
For his prized black rice specialties, he picks Fukucho "Moon on the Water" Junmai Ginjyo at $13 for 300ml or Rihaku "Dreamy Clouds" Unfiltered Tokubetsu Junmai at $14 for 300ml.
* Rihaku Nigori "Dreamy Clouds" Tokubetsu Junmai, 300ml ($13.99)--Sweet and wheaty opening flavors are prominent in this unfiltered (nigori) sake of 30 percent-polished rice (junmai).
Cathay: Translations from Ezra Pound, for the most part from the Chinese of Rihaku, from the notes of the late Ernest Fenollosa, and the decipherings of professors Mori and Ariga.
In Cathay, (4) using Ernest Fenollosa's (5) notes, Pound published fourteen poems, mostly by Rihaku (the Japanese name of Li Po that Pound and Fenollosa used), an eighth-century Chinese poet.
The "Rihaku" that is, the poet translated in Pound's "Cathay," is none other than Li Po by his Japanese name.
Vaast, and passages from Pound's version of Rihaku's "The Bowmen of Shu." Gaudier himself made the parallel: "like the chinese bowmen in Ezra's poem we had rathereat fern shoots than go back now" (Apples 3; Twelve l40).
Since Cathay's frontispiece announced its contents as "Translations by Ezra Pound for the most part from the Chinese of Rihaku," Pound's poetic innovations naturally appeared to stem from his Chinese sources.
The unhesitant dramatic quality of feeling and mood and the directness of address in the form of the dramatic lyric link Pound's "The Seafarer" with poems like "The Exile's Letter" or "The River-Merchant's Wife: a Letter," and the poet of The Seafarer with "Rihaku," with Pound presiding over both.
The lesson took a while to stick--in Cathay, which Pound also took from Fenollosa's notebooks, Pound translates Li Bai's (Rihaku's) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] paratactic [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] with hypotaxis; "Mind like a floating white cloud.