rimantadine


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Related to rimantadine: rimantadine HCl
Translations

rimantadine

n rimantadina
References in periodicals archive ?
Sample Report Access Source https://www.mrrse.com/sample/4301 Based on the product type, the Influenza Medication Market has been segmented into: Zanamivir, Oseltamivir, Peramivir, Amantadine, Rimantadine, Inosine and Others (laninamivir octanoate, etc.).
An asparagine that has been associated with reduced susceptibility to amantadine and rimantadine antiviral drugs was present at position 31 in the M2 protein, but we did not detect any signature motifs associated with resistance to antivirals targeting neuraminidase.
The use of amantadine and rimantadine in the treatment of influenza is therefore not recommended.
Amantadine and rimantadine are not recommended because of high levels of resistance to these drugs among circulating influenza A viruses (4).
Amantadine and rimantadine have both developed resistance to influenza A stains are no longer recommended.
According to World Health Organization guidelines published in 2007, "modified regimens of oseltamivir treatment, including twofold higher dosage, longer duration, and, possibly, combination therapy with amantadine or rimantadine (in countries where A(H5N1) viruses are likely to be susceptible to amantadines), may be considered on a case by case basis, especially in patients with pneumonia or progressive disease."
Currently, two classes of anti-influenza agents have been reported for influenza management and are under consideration for stockpiling in the event of an influenza pandemic; one of which targets the M2 ion channels (e.g., amantadine and rimantadine) and the another one inhibits neuraminidase (e.g., oseltamivir and zanamivir).
Up to date there are two classes of anti-influenza agents (i) NA inhibitors, oseltamivir, protecting the release and progeny of virion, and (ii) adamantine derivatives, amantadine and rimantadine, preventing the proton transfer in M2 ion channels (DeClercq, 2006).
Clinical trials have documented that amantadine hydrochloride [4,5,7,8,13] and its analog rimantadine hydrochloride [3,5,10,13,15] are effective drugs for the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza A virus infection.
While encouraging the use of the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza), the new guidelines emphasize that the antivirals amantadine (Symmetrel) and rimantadine (Flumadine) should not be used for influenza.
The vast majority of strains of the 2009 H1N1 virus are susceptible to oseltamivir and zanamivir, but essentially all strains are resistant to amantadine and rimantadine. (1) Therefore, all individuals who are hospitalized should be treated with one of two regimens:
Two classes of antiviral agents with activity against influenza are currently available: adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) (oseltamivir and zanamivir).